Core Faculty

Core Faculty

DeLosSantos, Jenevieve

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  • Position: Assistant Teaching Professor of Art History
  • Research Interests: Director of Special Pedagogic Projects
  • Ph.D., Rutgers University
  • Phone: 848.932.8436
  • Email: jdelossantos@sas.rutgers.edu
  • Office Hours: Via zoom or by appointment in person 35 College Ave, Room 203. Please e-mail

Jenevieve DeLosSantos is an Assistant Teaching Professor of Art History and the Director of Special Pedagogic Projects in the Office of Undergraduate Education, School of Arts and Sciences. She earned her Ph.D. in Art History from Rutgers University in 2015 with a focus in 19th century American orientalism. Prior to returning to Rutgers in 2016, she was the Coordinator of Academic Programs at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, where she also trained in museum education through the TIME (Teaching in Museum Education) program. Currently, she teaches “Women and Art” and the second half of the survey course, “Introduction to Art History: Art from 1450 to the Present” and has taught Byrne Seminars and courses on Impressionism and Modern Art in the past. She also advises the Art History Student Advisory Board, which brings together majors and minors to build to campus community and deeply engage with art history as a discipline, and serves on the department’s undergraduate curriculum committee.  

For the Office of Undergraduate Education, she works on projects, including running the Interdisciplinary Research Teams, managing dual enrollment programming with New Jersey high schools, coordinating the Voices of Diversity: Rutgers Student Stories panels, and hosting “Tea and Teaching with Jenevieve,” a popular weekly web series on interdisciplinary pedagogy. She is interested in the scholarship of teaching and learning in art history, and her current research explores inclusive and equitable teaching practices, particularly as they relate to the teaching of visual culture and language equity. Some of this can be seen in her co-edited volume of Art Journal Open that explores trauma-informed pedagogy as it relates to the teaching of visual culture and in the forthcoming volume with Rutgers University Press, “Poetries –Politics: A Multi-Lingual Project.” She also serves on the College Art Association’s Education Committee. 

Full -Time Faculty by Fields

Arts of the Americas

Tatiana Flores, Associate Professor 
Amber Wiley, Assistant Professor
Carla Yanni, Distinguished Professor

Art of Asia

Tamara Sears, Associate Professor

Ancient

John Kenfield, Associate Professor

Late Antique and Byzantine

Erik Thuno, Professor

Medieval

Erik Thuno, Professor
Tamara Sears, Associate Professor
Laura Weigert, Professor

Islamic

Deniz Turker, Assistant Professor

Italian Art and Architecture

Sarah Blake McHam, Distinguished Professor
John Kenfield, Associate Professor
Benjamin Paul, Associate Professor
Catherine Puglisi, Professor
Erik Thuno, Professor

Renaissance

Sarah Blake McHam, Distinguished Professor
Benjamin Paul, Associate Professor
Laura Weigert, Professor

Baroque

Catherine Puglisi, Professor

Nineteenth Century

Susan Sidlauskas, Professor
Carla Yanni, Professor
 

Twentieth-Century

Tatiana Flores, Associate Professor
Jane Sharp, Professor
Susan Sidlauskas, Professor
Amber Wiley, Assistant Professor
Carla Yanni, Professor
Andres Mario Zervigon, Professor

Contemporary

Tatiana Flores, Associate Professor
Jane Sharp, Professor

Architectural History

John Kenfield, Associate Professor
Carla Yanni, Professor   Tamara Sears, Associate Professor   Deniz Turker 
Amber Wiley, Assistant Professor 

History of Photography

Andres Mario Zervigon, Professor

Turker, Deniz

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  • Department: Department of Art History
  • Position: Assistant Professor; Islamic Art and Architecture
  • Research Interests: Islamic, Ottoman Empire
  • Ph.D. (History of Art and Architecture & Middle Eastern Studies) Harvard University.,
  • SMArchS (Aga Khan Program in Islamic Architecture) Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • B.A. (History of Art and Architecture) Yale College
  • Phone: (848) 932-1326
  • Email: deniz.turker@rutgers.edu
  • Office Hours: By appointment. Please e-mail to schedule a day and time.
  • Office Location: 60 College Avenue

 

Biographical Information:

I am a historian of Islamic art and architecture, who specializes in late-Ottoman visual and material cultures. My first book project, which traces the architectural and landscape history of Yıldız, the last Ottoman palace in Istanbul, is a study of modern sovereignty’s self-fashioning through novel representational modes such as photography, prefabs, and artificial landscapes. This vast site’s centurial transformation (from the 1790s to 1910s) not only reconstituted women in the Ottoman court as formidable patrons, but also allowed non-courtly members, actively involved in its creation, to shape the period’s garden history.

My most recent project is centered on historical conceptions of Anatolia, especially this geography’s articulation in the transition from empire to republic, from an Ottoman Anatolia to a Turkish one. I investigate such representational continuities and ruptures through the formation of historical institutions as well as archaeological excavations, museological displays, ethnographic studies, and state-commissioned artists’ surveys.  This project’s foundations rest in the 2018 exhibition I co-curated with Ahmet A. Ersoy (Boğaziçi University) and Bahattin Öztuncay (MEŞHER) at ANAMED (Koç University Research Center for Anatolian Civilizations) entitled Ottoman Arcadia: The Hamidian Expedition to the Land of Tribal Roots (1886).

Another project, slated for 2023 both as a display and catalogue, is based on the Greek and Ottoman embroideries in the collection of the Fitzwilliam Museum (Cambridge, UK) that once belonged to George de Menasce (d. 1967), a renowned ceramics collector from Alexandria. Research on this collection will highlight links between twentieth-century classical archaeology and textile collecting as well as broader queries on heritage formation and nationalisms in the Eastern Mediterranean.

I also have a sustained interest in the history of Islamic art collecting (especially in the nineteenth-century Ottoman and Egyptian contexts). In particular, I study the close early ties between collecting practices and history writing, book collecting, and global scholarly networks and museums.

Before joining Rutgers, I was at the University of Cambridge, first as a Fari Sayeed Visiting Fellow in Islamic Art and subsequently a post-doctoral research associate at the Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Centre of Islamic Studies. My doctoral and post-doctoral work has been supported by the Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, ANAMED, and the Leverhulme Trust.

 

Selected Publications:

“Angel of the Angels”: Abdüllatif Subhi Paşa’s Coins, History, and Egypt,” Muqarnas 38 (Spring, 2021, forthcoming).

Co-authored with Ahmet Ersoy (Boğaziçi University), “The Hamidian Visual Archive, 1878-1909: A User’s Manual,” for the Cemal Kafadar Festschrift (Academic Studies Press, forthcoming).

“ ‘Every Image is a Thought: Nineteenth-Century Gift-Albums and the Hamidian Visual Archive,” in Abdülhamid II’s Gift-Albums to Otto von Bismarck (Istanbul: Koç University Press, 2018), 64-83.

“Ottoman Horticulture after the Tulip Era: Botanizing Consuls, Garden Diplomacy, and the First Foreign Head-Gardener,” in Botany of Empire in the Long Eighteenth Century, ed. Yota Batsaki, Sarah Burke Cahalan, and Anatole Tchikine (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2016), 305-336.

“ ‘I don’t want orange trees, I want something that others don’t have’: Ottoman Head-Gardeners after Mahmud II,” International Journal of Islamic Architecture (IJIA) 4:2, Special Issue on the Conception and Use of Expertise in the Architecture of the Islamic World since 1800 (July 2015): 257–285.

“Hakky-Bey and His Journal, Le Miroir de l’Art Musulman, or, Mir’āt-ı ṣanāyi‘-ī islāmiye, 1898,” in Muqarnas 31 (November, 2014): 277–306.

PODCASTS:

http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2018/09/ottoman-arcadia.html

http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/02/turker.html