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2009 Keyjo Lee is Commencement Speaker

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Key Jo Lee of Willingboro, New Jersey, and the 2009 class of Douglass College, has been selected for this honor of being the student speaker at the university commencement on May 20, 2009. An art history major, Lee is a Douglass Scholar and a Ronald E. McNair Scholar, and was inducted into Phi Beta Kappa in her junior year.
Lee will be attending Yale University in a joint doctoral program in African-American studies and art history. She plans to study contemporary African-American art and the art of the African Diaspora, and hopes to become a professor of art history.
Most recently Key Jo was among a group of Art History students representing the department at a joint student symnposium in Princeton on April 24. Lee's paper was entitled "Jokes on Us versus Jokes by Us: The Humor of Manipulated Images in the Work of Ellen Gallagher and Kara Walker "
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Student Speaker
Key Jo Lee

Douglass College
Each year, a committee of faculty and staff members chooses an outstanding graduating senior to deliver the undergraduate commencement address from among nominees put forward by the deans of Rutgers’ undergraduate colleges and schools. This year, Key Jo Lee of Willingboro, New Jersey, has been selected for this honor. An art history major, Lee is a Douglass Scholar and a Ronald E. McNair Scholar, and was inducted into Phi Beta Kappa in her junior year.
Lee is a nontraditional-aged student, having enrolled at Rutgers as a first-year student after being out of school for several years. She found a welcoming home at Douglass where the Mary I. Bunting Program is especially designed to ease the transition to college for older students. As a sophomore, Lee assumed a leadership role among her peers, becoming president of the Sophia Organization for nontraditional-aged students and serving as a Bunting peer adviser and representative to the Douglass Governing Association. Throughout her junior and senior years, she continued as a mentor to older students and as resident assistant for the Sophia House, a residence for nontraditional-aged women students.
Lee’s dedication to academic excellence has been equal to her commitment to her peers and the campus community. She has excelled from the outset, making the Dean’s List every semester and maintaining between a 3.8 and 4.0 grade-point average. As early as the summer before her sophomore year, she undertook serious scholarly research, traveling to Urbino, Italy, on a grant from the Douglass Associate Alumnae. The following year, Lee was accepted into the Ronald E. McNair Postbaccalaureate Achievement Program, a national effort to encourage minority and low-income, first-generation college students to aim for graduate school. As a result of the program, Lee had the opportunity to present her research findings at conferences in Maryland and Illinois.
Lee has been accepted at Yale University in a joint doctoral program in African-American studies and art history. She plans to study contemporary African-American art and the art of the African Diaspora, and hopes to become a professor of art history.

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