Home Graduate Courses Graduate Courses - spring 2018

Graduate Courses - spring 2018

504:01. INDEPENDENT STUDY ART HISTORY

(By arrangement, Index 00755)

This course is an independent study with a chosen professor on an agreed topic. After gaining permission from the instructor a summary of the topic must be submitted to the graduate office and must be signed by both the professor and the student.

This course is not for Ph.D. qualifying exam study – see section 02.

 

504:02. INDEPENDENT STUDY ART HISTORY

(Qualifying Exam Section; By arrangement. Special permission required, Index 02476)

This section is reserved exclusively for Qualifying Examination study.

If you entered the graduate program

With a Master’s register for three (3) credits.

Without a Master’s register for six (6) credits.

 

509. AFRICAN ART AND ARCHITECTURE

(CAC, Thursdays, 9:50-12:30, VH001, Brett-Smith, index #20247)

 

591. INTERNSHIP IN HISTORIC PRESERVATION

(By arrangement. Special permission required, Index 04584)

 

593. TOPICS IN CHAPS: CEMETERIES, MONUMENTS AND MEMORIALS

(CAC, W 4:30-7:30pm, VH001, Woodhouse-Beyer, index #13626)

(Cross-listed with 01:082:441:01 and 01:506:391:02)

This cultural heritage course explores the history and material culture of the memorialization of individuals, social groups, and historic events through time, cultures, and landscapes. Our course material will include local, national, and global case studies and examples drawn from the fields of cultural heritage, cultural resource management, historic preservation, archaeology, anthropology, history, art history, death studies, landscape architecture, and the contemporary world. Why and how do we choose to remember/memorialize some individuals and events over others? What does the form and design of cemeteries, monuments, and monuments reveal about communities, culture, politics, and cultural/historical memory? Which memorial sites and spaces stay secular – and which become sacred ground? How and when do acts of memorialization become vehicles for mediating and reinterpreting the past? How and why do some sites associated with the dead and historic events become contested ground while others are forgotten? What is the role and purpose of “dark tourism” and studies of “negative heritage” as part of remembering and forgetting in the contemporary world?

SYLLABUS

 

594. TOPICS IN CHAPS: CULTURAL HERITAGE AND NEAR EASTERN ARCHAEOLOGY

(CAC, M 9:50am-12:50pm, ZAM-EDR, Al Kuntar, index #07446)

(Cross-listed with 01:082:441:02 and 01:506:391:03)

Cultural heritage studies have expanded rapidly in recent years, emerging as a field separate from archaeology and museum studies. In practice, the connection between archaeology and cultural heritage has proved to be complicated. This course will examine the contemporary practice of archaeology in the Middle East in relation to cultural heritage management in these countries. We will review the involvement of western and native archaeologists in the region and the intellectual traditions behind such involvement. We will also address questions on the role of Near Eastern archaeology in the production of cultural heritage: how was/is archaeological data used in political conflicts? How does CHM in certain countries shape archaeological practice? Can archaeological work produce cultural heritage that is meaningful/useful to the local communities around archaeological sites? What is global heritage?

SYLLABUS

 

595. CURATORIAL INTERNSHIP I

(By arrangement, Special permission required, Index 00756)

 

596. CURATORIAL INTERNSHIP II

(By arrangement, Special permission required, Index 00757)

 

601. SPECIAL TOPICS

(By arrangement, Special permission required, Index 09688)

 

603. ADVANCED TOPICS: HERITAGE AND VISUAL CULTURE

(CAC, W 9:50am-12:50pm, VH001, Gomes Coelho, index #19642)

(Cross listed with 01:082:442:02 and 01:506:391:05)

Images are virulent, and they intervene in every aspect of our sensorial engagement with the world. The ways in which vision dominates over other forms of perception are part of a wider process of sensorial mediation that is enabled and limited by power struggles. This process of sensorial mediation has a history, and is culturally contextual. Cultural heritage is an arena in which images are created, analyzed and exchanged with social and political intentions. Our first contact with heritage is usually mediated by images, and as professionals our expertise relies mostly in visual analysis.

This course aims to question the relationship between cultural heritage and visual culture. We will discuss the historical trajectories of the visual within heritage and preservation studies, as well as the ways in which heritage produces visual culture. We will focus on the circumstances in which heritage is documented, how heritage imagery circulates, and how it is used to intervene in society by generating affective responses—such as desire and disgust—that have an impact on the public perception of heritage as well as on its management.

We will also look at how the prominence of the visual over other forms of perception is being challenged in the western world, and what kind of alternatives we can propose for a multi-sensorial engagement with heritage.

SYLLABUS

 

605. METHODS IN CHAPS

(CAC, Tuesdays, 1:00-3:40, VH001, Rico, index #       )

This course offers a critical overview of the variety of methods that are used in the identification, documentation and management of cultural heritage. Students will engage with the different types of heritage sources and disciplines that define this subject of study in all its diversity, in order to discuss methods descriptively and critically. Each seminar will consider the documentation of heritage from a different disciplinary vantage point, inviting discussions on the intimate relationship between methods, theories and standards used in cultural heritage. This course offers a venue and support for students to discuss and define more robust methodologies in their research papers and dissertations.

SYLLABUS

 

607. CHAPS ADVANCED INTERNSHIP/FIELD STUDY

(By arrangement, Special permission required, index # 07425)

 

641. PROBLEMS IN BAROQUE ART OF ITALY AND SPAIN: CARAVAGGIO

(CAC, Tuesdays, 9:50-12:30, VH001, Puglisi, index #19902)

Focusing on our changing view of the artist, the seminar examines the latest archival discoveries and attributions, the implications of a growing body of technical analyses of individual works, and the varied approaches to the artist and his art in the recent scholarly literature. We will also consider Caravaggio in the popular imagination and media. Requirements include: preparation of weekly assigned readings for class discussion, acting as discussion leader at least once, a research project, whose results will be presented in an oral report and a substantial paper at the end of the semester. Although not required, Italian proficiency is useful.

 

657. PROBLEMS IN MODERN ART: BETWEEN PAINTINGS AND PHOTOGRAPHY: INTERMEDIALITY FROM THE MID-19TH CENTURY TO THE PRESENT

(CAC, Mondays, 1:00-3:40,HC-E128, Sidlauskas and Zervigon, index #19903)

Some time around the public introduction of photography in August 1839, artist Paul Delaroche saw a daguerreotype for the first time and reportedly exclaimed, “From this moment, painting is dead!” Delaroche’s response became typical for makers, consumers and observers of the arts who, since that fateful year, have concluded that painting and photography strongly influence each other as media, or even threaten to snuff out one or the other. But more recent studies have suggested that the relationship between painting and camera-based technologies can be better described as one of continual borrowing, both visually and conceptually. In the process, the imagined "boundaries" associated with each medium shifted or dissolved altogether, provoking a process that has created new visual forms such as “photographic” daguerreotypes rendered in woodblock engraving for the early illustrated press, the photorealism of painter Richard Estes, and the curiously static projections often found in installation art today. Our seminar will inquire into this process of borrowing and track the historical identification of pictorial media, the boundaries of which have been consistently fluid.

 

 

699. NON-THESIS STUDY

(By arrangement; Special permission required; Index 00758)

 

702. RESEARCH IN ART HISTORY

Prof.                     Sec.   Index

Brett-Smith           B2     03590

Flores                   F1       06165

St. Clair Harvey   H1     00759

Kenfield               K2     00760

Marder                 M1     00761

McHam                M3     00762

Paul                       P1    06167

Puglisi                   P2   02348

Rico                     R1   16037

Sharp                     S1    04791

Sidlauskas             S3    04982

Thunø                   T1  04792

Weigert               W1   06169

Yanni                   Y1   03556

Zervigón               Z1     05194

 

705. RESEARCH PROPOSAL

(By arrangement, Special permission required, Index 02812)

If you entered the graduate program:

With a Master’s register for three (3) credits.

Without a Master’s register for six (6) credits.

 

708. RESEARCH CULTURAL HERITAGE (CHAPS)

(By arrangement, Special permission required, Index 08004)

Directed research for advanced students working on the MA thesis.

Students will be supervised and evaluated by their advisor, who is chosen in conjunction with an area of specialization during the first year. Students will be graded on the quality of research and writing leading to the completed MA thesis.

 

800. MATRICULATION CONTINUED

(By permission of the Graduate Director, Index 00763)

 

811. GRADUATE FELLOWSHIP

(Index 00764)

If you are a fellowship recipient you must register for this course (zero credits).

Fellowship recipients must register for a minimum of 9 credits but no more than 16.  

Dissertation fellowship students (ABD’s) may register for less than 12 credits.

 

866. FULL GRADUATE ASSISTANTSHIP APPOINTMENT

(Index 00765)

If you hold a graduate assistantship in the Zimmerli you must register for this as six “E” credits.

 

877. TEACHING ASSISTANTSHIP (FULL)

(Index 00766)

If you have been awarded a teaching assistantship, you must register for this as six “E” credits.

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