Home Graduate Courses Graduate Courses - Fall 2017

Graduate Courses - Fall 2017

503:01. INDEPENDENT STUDY ART HISTORY

(By arrangement, Special permission required, Index 00848)

This course is an independent study with a chosen professor on an agreed topic. After gaining permission from the instructor a summary of the topic must be submitted to the graduate office and must be signed by both the professor and the student.

This course is not for Ph.D. qualifying exam study – see section 02.

503:02. INDEPENDENT STUDY ART HISTORY

(By arrangement. Special permission required, Index 02643)

506:01. APPROACHES TO ART HISTORY

(CAC, W, 1:00-3:40, VH 001, Weigert, Index 08424)

This graduate seminar is an introduction to the historiography of art history and to the range of methods and theories in the interpretation of art and its history from the foundation of the discipline to the present.

530:01 GLOBAL CULTURAL HERITAGE

(CAC, T, 1:10-4:10, VH 001, Rico, Index 07467)

This seminar addresses crucial issues of conservation and preservation within the rapidly changing world of the 21st century.

It is interdisciplinary in focus. Interested students from other disciplines are welcome.

563:01 CURATORIAL TRAINING

(CAC, H, 9:50-12:30, ZAM MORS, Sharp, Index 02569)

590. INTERNSHIP IN HISTORIC PRESERVATION

(By arrangement. Special permission required, Index 04370)

593. STUDIES IN CHAPS: CULTURAL HERITAGE, CONFLICT, AND DISASTERS

(CAC, W67, 4:30-7:30, VH001, Section: 01, Woodhouse-Beyer, Index 12843) (Cross-listed with 01:506:391:02 and 01:082:441:01)

In the past, and throughout the contemporary era, natural and cultural disasters of local, national, and international scale have challenged communities and cultural heritage sites around the world. This seminar course considers a variety of disaster events, such as hurricanes, earthquakes, tsunamis, climate change, pandemics, and human conflict/warfare/terrorism, and their effects on historic properties, archaeological sites, cultural landscapes, museum collections, communities, and cultures. Our seminar work will use cultural heritage, cultural resource management, and historic preservation approaches in our discussion of global case studies; consider strategies and protocols for disaster preparedness and post-disaster response/survey/preservation; explore how cultural heritage can be used a tool for peace, reconciliation, and rebuilding; learn post-disaster site and district assessment, restoration, and protection approaches and tools; and critically review and assess national and international cultural heritage disaster management plans.

594. STUDIES IN CHAPS

(CAC, T67, 4:30-7:30, VH001, Section: 01, Gomes Coelho, Index 07877) (Cross-listed with 01:506:391:04 and 01:082:442:01)

Cultural heritage is an entanglement of discourses and experiences that mediate the past in the present, and give meaning to our existence as socialized beings. Because of its associations with power, modernity and the West, heritage has been always an arena for social struggles. Defining heritage is a contested process that brings into confront different conceptions of identity and community, as well as different positionalities regarding economics, development, environmental sustainability, authenticity, ethics, and law. Over this course, we will critically examine cultural heritage, and how its professionals—e.g. anthropologists, archaeologists, art historians, museum professionals, architects—and stakeholders engage in the process of defining heritage. We will examine key issues in the work heritage such as the notions of authenticity, ownership, risk, protection, and responsibility.

595. CURATORIAL INTERNSHIP I

(By arrangement, Special permission required, Index 00849)

596. CURATORIAL INTERNSHIP II

(By arrangement, Special permission required, Index 00850)

601:01. SPECIAL TOPICS ART HISTORY

(CAC, M, 9:50-12:30, VH 001, Sears, Index 04578)

Nature, Landscape, and Environmental Art History

This seminar examines the interconnectness of visual culture and the built environment with both ideals of nature and real natural landscapes. While the core case studies will be drawn from South and Southeast Asia, the theoretical and conceptual framework of the course is designed to be portable across fields and subdisciplines. Students working outside of the region will be encouraged to draw comparisons from their own fields of specialization and to seek transnational connections with the materials covered in class. The course takes both historical and historiographic perspectives to consider both (a) how architects and artists engaged the natural environment in specific temporal contexts and (b) how the growing investment in environmental humanities has carved out new methodologies and critical apparatuses for the study of art history today. We will consider also the relationship among the varying approaches suggested by use of terminologies such as “eco-art history,” “environmental art history,” and “art history ecology.”

607. CHAPS ADVANCED INTERNSHIP/FIELD STUDY

(By arrangement, Special permission required, 08230)

636. TITIAN

(CAC, W, 4:00-6:40, VH 002, Paul, Index 20372)

Titian is the central figure in sixteenth-century Venetian art. In his long career he redefined virtually every aspect of Venetian painting including history painting, portraiture, the altarpiece, and ducal votive paintings. Together with Giorgione, he also invented the pastoral and introduced a new, much more open brushwork. This seminar will consider all these aspects within their historical context, discuss Titian’s style in relation to contemporary art theory, and investigate his self-fashioning as the Republic’s “Prince of Painters.”

Requirements will include the weakly preparation of three questions concerning the readings, an oral report on specified readings and the object of the student’s research, as well as a written research paper (12 pages in double space).

Textbook (not mandatory): Peter Humfrey, Titian, London, 2007.

SYLLABUS

699. NON-THESIS STUDY

(By arrangement; Special permission required; Index 00851)

702. RESEARCH IN ART HISTORY

Prof.                     Sec.   Index

Brett-Smith           B2     03929

Flores                   F1       07010

St. Clair Harvey   H1     00852

Kahlaoui               K1     07011

Kenfield               K2     00853

Marder                 M1     00854

McHam                 M3     00855

Paul                       P1      05897

Puglisi                   P2      02509

Rico                     R1     20112

Sears                     S1     05176

Sharp                     S2   07012

Sidlauskas             S3     05520

Thunø                   T1   05521

Weigert               W1   05898

Yanni                   Y1   03879

Zervigón               Z1     05522

705. RESEARCH PROPOSAL

(By arrangement, Special permission required, Index 03037)

If you entered the graduate program:

With a Master’s register for three (3) credits.

Without a Master’s register for six (6) credits.

708. RESEARCH CULTURAL HERITAGE (CHAPS)

(By arrangement, Special permission required, Index 08106)

Directed research for advanced students working on the MA thesis.

Students will be supervised and evaluated by their advisor, who is chosen in conjunction with an area of specialization during the first year. Students will be graded on the quality of research and writing leading to the completed MA thesis.

800. MATRICULATION CONTINUED

(By permission of the Graduate Director, Index 00856)

811. GRADUATE FELLOWSHIP

(Index 00857)

If you are a fellowship recipient you must register for this course (zero credits).

Fellowship recipients must register for a minimum of 9 credits but no more than 16.  

Dissertation fellowship students (ABD’s) may register for less than 12 credits.

866. FULL GRADUATE ASSISTANTSHIP APPOINTMENT

(Index 00858)

If you hold a graduate assistantship in the Zimmerli you must register for this as six “E” credits.

877. TEACHING ASSISTANTSHIP (FULL)

(Index 00859)

If you have been awarded a teaching assistantship, you must register for this as six “E” credits.

Contact Us

Voorhees Hall
71 Hamilton Street
New Brunswick, NJ, 08901


P  848-932-7041

F 732-932-1261
departmental email