Home Graduate Courses Graduate Courses Spring 2017

Graduate Courses Spring 2017

504:01. INDEPENDENT STUDY ART HISTORY

(By arrangement, Index 00780)

This course is an independent study with a chosen professor on an agreed topic. After gaining permission from the instructor a summary of the topic must be submitted to the graduate office and must be signed by both the professor and the student.

This course is not for Ph.D. qualifying exam study – see section 02.

 

504:02. INDEPENDENT STUDY ART HISTORY

(By arrangement. Special permission required, Index 02560)

 

591. INTERNSHIP IN HISTORIC PRESERVATION

(By arrangement. Special permission required, Index 04776)

 

592. CONSTRUCTING THE VICTORIAN CITY: NEW YORK AND LONDON

(CAC, M, 9:50-12:30, VH 001, Yanni, Index 20210)

 

This graduate seminar will explore the cultural and architectural history of two cities, London and New York, focusing on the long 19th century.  We will also explore representations of these two cities in paintings, prints, and photographs.  We will approach the city as a built space, as a crucible for the formation of social identities; the city here is an ever-changing environment particularly conducive to flows of people, ideas, and things.  London and New York, the commercial capitals of the nineteenth century in the west, are here broadly conceived to include the entire built environment, from the grand gestures of urban planners to the alleys of the East End and the tenements of the Lower East Side; we will study reform attempts, slum clearance, and the settlement movement. The gendered and sexed experience of the city will also be examined.  We will analyze the vast social and physical changes wrought by industry. Several sessions of the class will delve into building types (as defined by purpose, not shape): these include parks, museums, exhibitions, apartment houses, and office buildings. Together we will read accounts of the city as it was recorded by tourists, social reformers, architecture critics, and historians. We will study architecture from the point-of-view of the social historian—what did architecture mean to its various audiences? and how did it communicate?  Students will complete weekly reading assignments, write occasional one-page papers based on the readings, give an in-class presentation, and complete a final paper.  All the readings are on the Sakai site or they are available on-line.  Students will be encouraged to write a final paper that is related to their own specialization within art history, as long as the topic is keyed into the main themes of the course and stays within the time period.

Syllabus

 

593. STUDIES IN CHAPS: CULTURE, PRESERVATION AND POLITICS IN THE MIDDLE EAST

(CAC, M67, 4:30-7:30, VH 001, Section: 01, Kahlaoui, Index 15063)

This course is cross listed with 01:082:441:01 and 01:506:301:01

The Middle East is one of the richest archeological regions in the world. Yet, ironically, military conflicts aimed at establishing stability in the area have contributed to the deterioration of cultural artifacts and sites at an alarming rate. Military action, political indifference, and a vacuum of knowledge – linguistic, artistic, political, and cultural – have endangered the possibilities for preserving the essence of Middle Eastern art and archaeology and the roots of western European tradition. This course is about war and cultural heritage, politics and preservation as the new realities of our future. This course begins with a review of similar situations of war and art, from napoleon to World War II and Vietnam (“we had to destroy it in order to save it”). Our work then moves quickly to a discussion of Middle Eastern art and archaeology, including the sack of the Iraq museum in Baghdad and the looting of sites in the countryside throughout the region. Half of the course is devoted to understanding both the art and archaeology of the region, and the other half is devoted to tracing their fate and their future under the challenge of present circumstances. This course will answer two questions. The first is: what do we need to know about the art history of Egypt, Iraq, Iran, Syria, and Afghanistan?  The second is:  what are the threats to its survival for future generations?  The course targets art history and CHAPS students. It will emphasize both visual approaches and preservation practices, and their relation to the respective social environments.


Requirements will include informal discussion of common readings, oral reports on specific issues, and a 15-page research paper.

Syllabus

594. STUDIES IN CHAPS: CEMETERIES, MONUMENTS AND MEMORIALS

(CAC, W67, 4:30-7:30, VH 001, Section: 01, Woodhouse-Beyer, Index 07853)

This course is cross listed with 01:082:441:02 and 01:506:391:02

This cultural heritage course explores the history and material culture of the memorialization of individuals, social groups, and historic events through time, cultures, and landscapes. Our course material will include local, national, and global case studies and examples drawn from the fields of cultural heritage, cultural resource management, historic preservation, archaeology, anthropology, history, art history, death studies, landscape architecture, and the contemporary world. Why and how do we choose to remember/memorialize some individuals and events over others? What does the form and design of cemeteries, monuments, and monuments reveal about communities, culture, politics, and cultural/historical memory? Which memorial sites and spaces stay secular – and which become sacred ground? How and when do acts of memorialization become vehicles for mediating and reinterpreting the past? How and why do some sites associated with the dead and historic events become contested ground while others are forgotten? What is the role and purpose of “dark tourism” and studies of “negative heritage” as part of remembering and forgetting in the contemporary world?

Attendance (includes participation/article introductions) 20%; Case Study Report 1 20%; Case Study Report 2 20%; Cemetery/Monument/or Memorial paper 20%; Research Paper 20%                   

No prerequisites are required to join our course – undergraduates/graduates from all disciplines are welcome!

Syllabus

595. CURATORIAL INTERNSHIP I

(By arrangement, Special permission required, Index 00781)

596. CURATORIAL INTERNSHIP II

(By arrangement, Special permission required, Index 00782)

599. CURATORIAL INTERNSHIP III

(By arrangement, Special permission required, Index 03199)

601. SPECIAL TOPICS

(By arrangement, Special permission required, Index 10266)

 

603. ADVANCED TOPICS: CHAPS

(CAC, TH23, 09:50-12:50, VH 001, Rico, Index 07854)

This course is cross listed with 01:082:442:01 and 01:506:391:03

This course offers a critical overview of the variety of methods that are used in the identification, documentation and management of cultural heritage. Students will engage with the different types of heritage sources and disciplines that define this subject of study in all its diversity, in order to discuss methods descriptively and critically. Each seminar we will consider the documentation of heritage from a different disciplinary vantage point and discuss the intimate relationship between methods, theories and standards used in cultural heritage. This course offers a venue and support for students to discuss and define more robust methodologies in their research papers and dissertations.

Syllabus

 

607. CHAPS ADVANCED INTERNSHIP/FIELD STUDY

(By arrangement, Special permission required, 07832)

 

622. PROBLEMS IN MEDIEVAL ART: THE OTHER ARTS OF THE LATE MIDDLE AGES AND NORTHERN RENAISSANCE (CAC, T, 4:00-6:40, VH 001, Section: 01, Weigert, 11176)

This seminar looks at artistic production in the realms of the French kings and Burgundian Dukes from the fourteenth through the early sixteenth century. We will focus on embroidery and tapestry, “tableaux vivants” and interludes, manuscript illumination and painted cloth, prints and metalwork, jewelry and gems. Our discussion will also include the “arte del disegno” (painting, sculpture, and architecture) but only in so far as they interact with and inform the other arts at the time. We will read foundational texts in this field, as well as more recent work on the concepts of intermediality, mediation, and media archeology. In so doing, we will evaluate the relevance of the concept of “media” to describe the specificity of these materials and techniques of communication and explore the emergence and impact of new visual technologies in the fifteenth century.

No background in the arts of this period is required. What is required is an interest in how shifting our focus from the categories Vasari codified revises the long standing art historical account of the distinctness of individual media and the art historical practice that relies on a particular mimetic model and theory of spectatorship.

Assignments:

  1. active participation in all seminar meetings
  2. two to three presentations of works of art and of reading assignments
  3. a twenty-minute presentation and final research paper (no longer than 10-12 pages in length). In order to structure your time, you will be given deadlines to submit: an idea for your topic; a title, short bibliography, and one-paragraph abstract; and the class presentation.

Syllabus available upon request to Professor Weigert.

630. PROBLEMS IN FIFTEENTH-CENTURY ITALIAN PAINTING AND SCULPTURE

(CAC, M, 4:00-6:40, Art Library seminar room, McHam, Index 20211)

This seminar will reconsider the contributions of the artists usually considered to be the founders of Italian Renaissance art, and hence of the early modern tradition in Europe. In 1435-36, the multi-talented intellectual and art theorist Leon Battista Alberti dedicated his treatise On Painting, which was the first evaluation of the cultural potentials of contemporary Florentine art, to the architect Brunelleschi, and singled out the sculptors Ghiberti, Donatello, and Luca della Robbia, and the painter Masaccio as the figures he considered to be the pioneers of a revolutionary new style. That evaluation has never wavered, but in the last decade our understanding of these figures has been transformed by new books (one by a Rutgers alum), articles, and exhibitions; that on the Della Robbia at the NGA, Washington, we shall visit as a group.

There will be ten weeks of seminar discussions based on selected readings, in which I shall lead off with an overview of the artist’s career and surrounding issues. Students will be assigned to present 10-15 minute summaries of the readings in those seminars. In the last weeks of the semester, students will give 25-minute oral presentations on research topics of their choice. These will then be written up as research papers to be turned in at semester’s end.

Syllabus

 

698. EXHIBITION SEMINAR: “RELATIONAL UNDERCURRENTS: COMTEMPORARY ART OF THE CARIBBEAN ARCHIPELAGO”

(CAC, JANUARY 19 TO FEBRUARY 24, 2017, THURSDAYS: VH-001, 1-3:40 OR 1-5; FRIDAYS: LOCATION BY ARRANGEMENT, 9AM-6PM, Flores, 12919)

 

This course is a hands-on workshop to involve students in the preparation of the exhibition “Relational Undercurrents: Contemporary Art of the Caribbean Archipelago,” for the Museum of Latin American Art, Long Beach, CA, scheduled from September 2017 to January 2018. The exhibition is part of Pacific Standard Time: Latin America / Los Angeles, an initiative spearheaded by the Getty Foundation to fund exhibitions of Latin American art in Southern California in 2017. The course will cover the process of the exhibition, from concept to production. In addition to active class participation, completion of assigned readings, and class presentations, the students will be expected to produce labels, wall text, and short bios of the artists, as well as assisting with the press release and other exhibition materials. Guest speakers, including other curators, artists, and contributors to the catalogue, will be invited to campus.

The class will meet on Thursdays from 1 to 5 PM, unless there are departmental events scheduled, in which case, we will meet from 1 to 3:40 PM. We will typically visit New York on Fridays, to view exhibitions together, go to the studios of the artists in the show, and speak to museum professionals.

The course is open to graduate students in Art History, Studio Art, and Caribbean and Latin American Studies and the Humanities.

More information on the exhibition is available here: http://www.pacificstandardtime.org/en/exhibitions/exhibit/view/Relational-Undercurrents-Contemporary-Art-Caribbean-Archipelago

For questions, please contact Prof. Flores (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

 

 

699. NON-THESIS STUDY

(By arrangement; Special permission required; Index 00783)

 

702. RESEARCH IN ART HISTORY

Prof.                     Sec.   Index

Brett-Smith           B2     03726

Flores                   F1       06452

St. Clair Harvey   H1     00784

Howard                     H2          06453

Kahlaoui               K1     06454

Kenfield               K2     00785

Marder                 M1    00786

McHam                 M3     00787

Paul                       P1   06455

Puglisi                   P2              02425

Rico                     R1     20212

Sharp                     S1   04989

Sheehan                 S2   06456

Sidlauskas             S3     05194

Thunø                   T1   04990

Weigert               W1   06457

Yanni                   Y1   03692

Zervigón               Z1     05419

 

705. RESEARCH PROPOSAL

(By arrangement, Special permission required, Index 02912)

If you entered the graduate program:

With a Master’s register for three (3) credits.

Without a Master’s register for six (6) credits.

708. RESEARCH CULTURAL HERITAGE (CHAPS)

(By arrangement, Special permission required, Index 08452)

Directed research for advanced students working on the MA thesis.

Students will be supervised and evaluated by their advisor, who is chosen in conjunction with an area of specialization during the first year. Students will be graded on the quality of research and writing leading to the completed MA thesis.

800. MATRICULATION CONTINUED

(By permission of the Graduate Director, Index 00788)

811. GRADUATE FELLOWSHIP

(Index 00789)

If you are a fellowship recipient you must register for this course (zero credits).

Fellowship recipients must register for a minimum of 9 credits but no more than 16.  

Dissertation fellowship students (ABD’s) may register for less than 12 credits.

866. FULL GRADUATE ASSISTANTSHIP APPOINTMENT

(Index 00790)

If you hold a graduate assistantship in the Zimmerli you must register for this as six “E” credits.

 

877. TEACHING ASSISTANTSHIP (FULL)

(Index 00791)

If you have been awarded a teaching assistantship, you must register for this as six “E” credits.

878. TEACHING ASSISTANTSHIP (PART)

(Index 09870)

Contact Us

Voorhees Hall
71 Hamilton Street
New Brunswick, NJ, 08901


P  848-932-7041

F 732-932-1261
departmental email