Home Undergraduate Courses Undergraduate courses spring 2018

Undergraduate courses spring 2018

101. INTRODUCTION TO ARCHITECTURE

(LIV, TF, 12:00-1:20pm, Tillet 207, Section: 01, Yanni, Index 16034)

PLEASE NOTE: CREDIT NOT GIVEN FOR THIS COURSE AND 01:082:392

This course can be used to fulfill the CC and  AHp areas of the Core - http://sasundergrad.rutgers.edu/academics/requirements/core

The contemporary global issue that will be analyzed in this class is the paradox presented by architecture.  All architects imagine that they are building for the future; but past architecture often seems wrong-headed or impossibly short-sighted. Architecture is a science, an art, and a business. In the twenty-first century, we live in buildings and we are surrounded by designed (and accidental) spaces. Some of the buildings we inhabit are old, some are new, but all of them carry meaning and influence behavior. Occupants of buildings push back against the intentions of architects. Green buildings contribute to environmental recuperation, while other buildings damage the environment. Real estate developers and local communities are at odds. Building new works of architecture is a powerful tool of political propaganda, and the destruction of cultural heritage is as well. We will explore architecture as an essential part of global artistic exchange. In the face of extreme population growth, environmental degradation, ideological divisions, and resource inequality, how should architects and urban planners construct for the next generation? How can historically subjected people use architecture to reassert their political and cultural agency? To explore these issues, this course will analyze buildings in their social historical contexts. Students will learn to see the built environment through new eyes, to think about their individual interactions with architecture, and to think about how designers, business people, and consumers of architecture can together create ethically sound buildings for the future. 

-No memorization is necessary for the quizzes or the final.

-Non-majors welcome.

SYLLABUS

 

105. INTRODUCTION TO ART HISTORY

(LIV, TTH5, 5:00 – 6:20, TIL-258, Section: 02, Paulsen Index 12484)

This course can be used to fulfill the HST and AHp areas of the Core - http://sasundergrad.rutgers.edu/academics/requirements/core

 

This course presents an introductory overview of the history of Western art from antiquity to the late medieval period. It considers the achievements of great civilizations ranging from Egypt to the Holy Roman Empire, and focuses on a diversity of cultural and religious traditions, including, Byzantine, Islamic, and Jewish. The class examines a wide array of objects, including statues of gods and emperors, reliquaries containing saints’ bones, Greek temples and Gothic cathedrals, early synagogue decoration, devotional manuscripts, and gold-gilded altarpieces.

Emphasizing significant stylistic movements in Western Europe, this course lays the groundwork for more advanced art history courses by introducing visual analysis and other interpretative tools of art historical research. Students will also learn how the visual products of a culture relate to historical circumstances, societal values, and shifting personal and collective identities. The skills developed in this class provide important tools for navigating and interpreting media and visual representation in the twenty-first century.

SYLLABUS

 

105. INTRODUCTION TO ART HISTORY

(CAC, TTH8, 7:40 – 9:00, VH105, Section: 03, Instructor Levinsohn, Index 03534)

This course can be used to fulfill the HST and AHp areas of the Core - http://sasundergrad.rutgers.edu/academics/requirements/core

This course presents an introductory overview of the history of Western art from antiquity to the late medieval period. It considers the achievements of great civilizations ranging from Egypt to the Holy Roman Empire, and focuses on a diversity of cultural and religious traditions, including, Byzantine, Islamic, and Jewish. The class examines a wide array of objects, including statues of gods and emperors, reliquaries containing saints’ bones, Greek temples and Gothic cathedrals, early synagogue decoration, devotional manuscripts, and gold-gilded altarpieces.

Emphasizing significant stylistic movements in Western Europe, this course lays the groundwork for more advanced art history courses by introducing visual analysis and other interpretative tools of art historical research. Students will also learn how the visual products of a culture relate to historical circumstances, societal values, and shifting personal and collective identities. The skills developed in this class provide important tools for navigating and interpreting media and visual representation in the twenty-first century.

SYLLABUS

 

106. INTRODUCTON TO ART HISTORY

(Cook/Douglass, MTH2, 10:55-12:15, ARH-200, Section: 25, Instructor Paulsen, Index 03535)

This course can be used to fulfill the HST and AHp areas of the Core - http://sasundergrad.rutgers.edu/academics/requirements/core

This course presents an introductory overview of the history of Western art from the Renaissance to the present, including the achievements of artistic giants, spanning from Leonardo Da Vinci to Kara Walker.  It covers works in a wide array of media, such as painting, sculpture, architecture, prints, photography, performance, and the moving image. Emphasizing significant stylistic movements in Europe and the Americas, this class lays the groundwork for more advanced art history courses by introducing visual analysis and other interpretative tools of art historical research. Students will also learn how the visual products of a culture relate to historical circumstances, societal values, and shifting personal and collective identities.  The skills developed in this course provide important tools for navigating and interpreting media and visual representation in the twenty-first century.

SYLLABUS

 

106. INTRODUCTON TO ART HISTORY

(CAC, MW8, 7:40-9:00, VH 105, Section: 30, Instructor Matsumura, Index 00007)

This course can be used to fulfill the HST and AHp areas of the Core - http://sasundergrad.rutgers.edu/academics/requirements/core

 

This course presents an introductory overview of the history of Western art from the Renaissance to the present, including the achievements of artistic giants, spanning from Leonardo Da Vinci to Kara Walker.  It covers works in a wide array of media, such as painting, sculpture, architecture, prints, photography, performance, and the moving image. Emphasizing significant stylistic movements in Europe and the Americas, this class lays the groundwork for more advanced art history courses by introducing visual analysis and other interpretative tools of art historical research. Students will also learn how the visual products of a culture relate to historical circumstances, societal values, and shifting personal and collective identities.  The skills developed in this course provide important tools for navigating and interpreting media and visual representation in the twenty-first century.

SYLLABUS

 

106. INTRODUCTION TO ART HISTORY

(Online, Sections 90-A4, Zervigon, Various Index Numbers)

This course can be used to fulfill the HST and AHp areas of the Core -

http://sasundergrad.rutgers.edu/academics/requirements/core

 

The course offers an introductory overview of the history of Western and some Non-Western art from the Renaissance to the present, including the achievements of artistic giants, spanning from Leonardo Da Vinci to Kara Walker. It covers works in a wide array of media, such as painting, sculpture, architecture, prints, photography, performance, and the moving image. Emphasizing significant stylistic movements primarily in Europe and the Americas but also globally, this class lays the groundwork for more advanced art history courses by introducing visual analysis and other interpretative tools of art historical research. Students will also learn how the visual products of a culture relate to historical circumstances, societal values, and shifting personal and collective identities. The skills developed in this course provide important tools for navigating and interpreting media and visual representation in the twenty-first century.

SAMPLE SYLLABUS

 

205. INTRO TO ASIAN ART

(LIV, MW, 1:40-3:00pm, Beck 253, Sears, index #19833)

Moving chronologically and thematically, this course surveys the history of art across Asia, with particular emphasis on India, China, and Japan, and with forays into Southeast Asia. Each week’s lectures highlight key moments in Asia’s visual history, beginning with the earliest civilizations of the bronze age and moving through to the politics of globalizing art worlds in the present day. A strong emphasis will be placed on parallel developments, on important cultural connections, and on moments of cultural contact through pilgrimage and trade. Among the topics to be covered are included the following: urbanism, architecture and the built environment, sculpture in various media, decorative arts, ceramics, illustrated manuscripts, scrolls and painting; portraiture; theology and ritual arts; colonialism and globalization; and contemporary arts and artistic revivals. This course is intended as an introductory survey, and no background is necessary for its successful completion.

SYLLABUS 

 

214. RENAISSANCE ART IN EUROPE

(CAC, MW, 2:50-4:10pm, ZAM-MPR, McHam, index #16032)

In our era many European countries have united to form a single state in terms of their monetary systems and many of their regulations. That alliance is showing signs of fraying, because in part they are running counter to more than 1500 years of independence and cultural and linguistic differences. Nowhere is that diversity more apparent than during the Renaissance, defined for our purposes here as the fourteenth through sixteenth centuries, which represents a universally recognized high point in artistic achievement all over Europe. This class will examine a series of masterpieces from the European tradition that reveal artistic forms that were intrinsic to culture north and south of the Alps, with the goal of pointing out their different features as well as their commonalities. Most of them were not considered works of art in their day, but instead visual aids to religious practice, a means of commemorating an individual, or objects to decorate or to promote pleasure. The broader objective is to create a background that leads to a better understanding of European culture in the epoch of the development of early modern culture.

Requirements:

Grade distribution:

• Midterm Exam: 15 %

• Visit to the Metropolitan Museum of Art and paper on a work of art you saw there 20%

• Class Participation in Discussion: 15 %

• 2nd 3-4-page analysis paper 25 % (grade of 1st paper doesn’t count)

●Final exam: 25 %

SYLLABUS

 

321. Art of Early China

(CAC, TTH, 6:10-7:30pm, VH104, Bower, index #19643)

In this class we will examine the art of China as it evolves from the simplicity of the Banpo Village of the prehistoric period (ca. 5000 BCE) to the splendor of the cosmopolitan Tang dynasty (618-907 CE) of the imperial era. With an emphasis on recent archaeological finds and current scholarly discussion, this class will provide an opportunity for those students who already have some knowledge of this topic to gain a deeper understanding of subjects only lightly touched upon in surveys. However, no prerequisite is required for this class and all are welcome. Essential information about China will be included in the lectures and reading. By the end of this class a student will come to a better understanding of how not only the art, but the civilization of China developed over time, and will possess the knowledge and analytical skills to independently research this and related matters. This is primarily a lecture class, but student input is encouraged. Class handouts will be distributed in class and posted also online via the Sakai Online Learning System as will also Powerpoint context and key images for review and study. Grading will be based on quizzes and examinations which may include a take-home component as well as a short museum-based paper; these will be detailed in the Final Syllabus. Class Attendance and Participation as well as Improvement in Performance will also be taken into account in determining the Final Grade.

SYLLABUS

 

333, PRE-COLUMBIAN ART

(CAC TTH, 1:10-2:30pm, VH104, Brett-Smith, index #19645)

Art History 333, Pre-Columbian art,  investigates the pre-conquest civilizations of Middle America: the Olmec, Teotihuacan, the Maya, the Toltec, and the Aztec cultures.  It emphasizes the roles of shamanism, hallucinogenic voyages to the world of spirits, the importance of water and maize, and human sacrifice.  I hope to explore recent discoveries such as that of liquid mercury underneath the pyramid of the serpent at Teotihuacan and that of Maya murals at San Bartolo, Guatemala.  Some discoveries are not yet clearly understood, so there is room for students to explore this material and advance new hypotheses.  At the end of the course we will discuss the themes that link all the Middle American, pre-hispanic cultures.

SYLLABUS

 

343. LATER GREEK ART

(CAC, TTH 1:10-2:30, ZAM-EDR, Kenfield, index #19647)

Survey of classical and Hellenistic Greek art

SYLLABUS

 

366. SPANISH PAINTING

(CAC, TTH 2:50-4:10, ZAM-MPR, Puglisi, index #19648)

This course explores art in Spain from the early Renaissance to Romanticism. The focus is on major artists and patrons who shaped the Spanish artistic tradition: the court of Ferdinand and Isabella, El Greco in Toledo, Philip II and the Escorial, Velázquez at the court of Philip IV in Madrid, Zurbarán in Seville, and the painting and prints of Goya. We will discuss quintessential Spanish themes, both sacred (Immaculate Conception, visionary experience) and secular (court portraits, Jesters and Dwarves). Although the primary focus is on the Spanish peninsula, we will also discuss the transmission and transformation of Spanish art in Colonial Latin America.

SYLLABUS 

 

368. MODERN AMERICAN ART

(CAC, W 9:50am-12:50pm, ZAM-EDR, Taube, index #19834)

This course will explore a dynamic period in the history of American art and culture, from the 1870s to the 1950s. Topics will include the increasingly international outlook of American artists; the shifting representation of gender and race during a time of nation building, immigration, and globalization; and the rise of Modernism and abstraction along with the search for roots and artistic heritage in the first half of the twentieth century. We will address representative works by both canonical and lesser known artists, such as Thomas Eakins, Winslow Homer, John Singer Sargent, Cecilia Beaux, Henry Ossawa Tanner, Augustus Saint Gaudens, Robert Henri, Georgia O’Keeffe, Alfred Stieglitz, Stuart Davis, Thomas Hart Benton, Edward Hopper, Dorothea Lange, Augusta Savage, Jacob Lawrence, Diego Rivera, and Jackson Pollock. Rather than an exhaustive survey, this class will consider a relatively small number of key works by each artist and will explore a variety of media—painting, sculpture, photography, and printmaking. The lectures will be supplemented by critical readings that approach the course material from diverse perspectives. Course requirements include a midterm and a final exam; a visual analysis paper; a reading response paper; a short writing assignment focused on an artwork; and an in-class writing assignment that serves as practice for the midterm exam. 

SYLLABUS

 

379. IMAGES & ARCHITECTURE IN MEDIEVAL ROME

(CAC, TTH 1:10-2:30pm, ZAM-MPR, Thunø, index #19835)

The goal of the course is to enable students to identify, discuss, and interpret works of art and architecture. Students should demonstrate their knowledge of a large set of visual artifacts from a diverse range of periods and be able to place them within their historical contexts. They should be able to employ skills of critical thinking in their written and oral expression and be able to construct an historical argument that incorporates images in a meaningful way. Majors and minors should be able to recognize and understand the fundamental interpretive methods engaged by art historians and should employ the appropriate technologies for conducting research in the history of art, including print and electronic resources.

SYLLABUS

 

403. METHODS AND APPROACHES TO ART AND ART HISTORY

(CAC, T 4:30-7:30pm, VH001, Weigert, index #16033)

This seminar is an introduction to the historiography of art history and to the range of methods and theories about art and its history from the foundation of the discipline to the present. Among the questions we will ask are: how does the connoisseur, the philosopher, or the historian approach art? Most of our work will take place in the seminar room or in the museum and gallery space. We will present, discuss, debate, and test a range of methods and approaches to different fields of art, ranging from prehistoric to contemporary. You will bring your knowledge from other art history classes to the table, delve more deeply into other periods of art, and develop new ways of thinking about art, its history, and art history as a field of study.

Requirements:

  1. Active participation in all seminar meetings.
  2. Serving as discussion leader for at least one seminar meeting.
  3. 4 critical response papers, no longer than 2 pages each, due in seminar meeting. The paper in which you are least satisfied will not be factored into your final grade.
  4. Two substantive questions concerning the readings, to be submitted on Sakai by noon on Tuesdays, except for seminar leaders.
  5. An annotated outline and presentation of a work of art of your choice.

Useful surveys of art historical methods and writing include:

-Michael Hatt and Charlotte Klonk, Art History. A critical introduction to its methods

(Manchester and New York, 2006).

-Art History and Its Methods, ed. Eric Fernie (London: Phaidon, 1995).

-The Art of Art History: A Critical Anthology, ed. Donald Preziosi (Oxford: Oxford

University Press, 1998)

-Critical Terms for Art History, eds. Robert Nelson and Richard Schiff (Chicago:

University of Chicago Press, 1996; second edition, 2003).

Chris Murray ed., Key Writers of Art: From Antiquity to the Nineteenth Century

(Abingdon and New York: Routledge: 2003)

Chris Murray ed., Key Writers on Art: The Twentieth Century (Abingdon and New York:  Routledge 2003)

Margaret Iversen and Stephen Melville, Writing Art History. Disciplinary Departures,

(Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2010).

All readings listed on the syllabus are available under resources on Sakai.

SYLLABUS 

 

441:01 TOPICS IN CHAPS: CEMETERIES, MONUMENTS AND MEMORIALS

(CAC, W 4:30-7:30pm, VH001, Woodhouse-Beyer, index #13832)

(Cross-listed with 01:506:391:02 and 16:082:593:01)

This cultural heritage course explores the history and material culture of the memorialization of individuals, social groups, and historic events through time, cultures, and landscapes. Our course material will include local, national, and global case studies and examples drawn from the fields of cultural heritage, cultural resource management, historic preservation, archaeology, anthropology, history, art history, death studies, landscape architecture, and the contemporary world. Why and how do we choose to remember/memorialize some individuals and events over others? What does the form and design of cemeteries, monuments, and monuments reveal about communities, culture, politics, and cultural/historical memory? Which memorial sites and spaces stay secular – and which become sacred ground? How and when do acts of memorialization become vehicles for mediating and reinterpreting the past? How and why do some sites associated with the dead and historic events become contested ground while others are forgotten? What is the role and purpose of “dark tourism” and studies of “negative heritage” as part of remembering and forgetting in the contemporary world?

SYLLABUS 

 

441:02 TOPICS IN CHAPS: CULTURAL HERITAGE AND NEAR EASTERN ARCHAEOLOGY

(CAC, M 9:50am-12:50pm, ZAM-EDR, Al Kuntar, index #09950)

(Cross-listed with 01:506:391:03 and 16:082:594:01)

Cultural heritage studies have expanded rapidly in recent years, emerging as a field separate from archaeology and museum studies. In practice, the connection between archaeology and cultural heritage has proved to be complicated. This course will examine the contemporary practice of archaeology in the Middle East in relation to cultural heritage management in these countries. We will review the involvement of western and native archaeologists in the region and the intellectual traditions behind such involvement. We will also address questions on the role of Near Eastern archaeology in the production of cultural heritage: how was/is archaeological data used in political conflicts? How does CHM in certain countries shape archaeological practice? Can archaeological work produce cultural heritage that is meaningful/useful to the local communities around archaeological sites? What is global heritage?

SYLLABUS

 

442:02 TOPICS IN CHAPS: HERITAGE AND VISUAL CULTURE

(CAC, W 9:50am-12:50pm, VH001, Gomes Coelho, index #19651)

(Cross listed with 01:506:391:05 and 16:082:603:02)

Images are virulent, and they intervene in every aspect of our sensorial engagement with the world. The ways in which vision dominates over other forms of perception are part of a wider process of sensorial mediation that is enabled and limited by power struggles. This process of sensorial mediation has a history, and is culturally contextual. Cultural heritage is an arena in which images are created, analyzed and exchanged with social and political intentions. Our first contact with heritage is usually mediated by images, and as professionals our expertise relies mostly in visual analysis.

This course aims to question the relationship between cultural heritage and visual culture. We will discuss the historical trajectories of the visual within heritage and preservation studies, as well as the ways in which heritage produces visual culture. We will focus on the circumstances in which heritage is documented, how heritage imagery circulates, and how it is used to intervene in society by generating affective responses—such as desire and disgust—that have an impact on the public perception of heritage as well as on its management.

We will also look at how the prominence of the visual over other forms of perception is being challenged in the western world, and what kind of alternatives we can propose for a multi-sensorial engagement with heritage.

SYLLABUS

 

487. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MODERN ART: MODERN ITALIAN ARCHITECTURE: BALANCING PAST, PRESENT, AND FUTURE

(CAC, TH 4:30-7:30pm, VH001, Bzdaks, index #19918)

This course will explore the tension between architectural progress and tradition, which has defined modern Italy from Reunification in 1860 to the present. A range of late 19th and 20th century architectural movements will be studied, with a focus on the cities of Rome, Milan, Genoa, Turin, Florence, and Naples. The mutually beneficial relationship of industrial and architectural design, the use of architecture as a tool to create civic identity, and the influence of design journals on the architectural profession will be highlighted. The course will conclude with a discussion of the pressures of globalization on Italy’s major civic centers, as well as the role of Italian architects on the international stage.

SYLLABUS 

 

492:01 CAPSTONE IN ART HISTORY: SECULAR ART IN THE ITALIAN RENAISSANCE

(CAC, M 9:50am-12:50pm, VH001, McHam, index #12349)

This seminar will explore the development of secular art in the Italian Renaissance from the emergence of portraiture, that is, the commemoration of contemporaries, to the introduction of non-religious themes such as mythologies, vernacular and Roman legends and history, and chivalric themes that were chosen to decorate domestic residences. It will also consider the objects people commissioned to mark important life passages such as birth and marriage and the emergence of new media like prints and statuettes that were particularly suited to the new subjects and private residential settings. Long overlooked in the emphasis on religious and civic art, the field of secular art has recently opened up to investigation. This seminar will introduce students to the new thinking and the most recent literature in the field that has revised our understanding of the private lives of Renaissance Italians.

               Students will be graded on their contributions to discussions in the seminar, on their presentation of their research in an oral report to the group, and on their paper writing up this research (12 pages).

SYLLABUS

 

492:02 CAPSTONE IN ART HISTORY; HELLENISTIC SCULPTURE AND PAINTING

(CAC, M 1:10-4:10pm, VH001, Kenfield, index #15723)

This Capstone Seminar in Art History focused on the late Greek style of sculpture and painting known as Hellenistic.  Hellenistic art is richly diverse in subject matter and shows influence from cultures outside Greece itself. It is known for drama, movement, and expressiveness, and is sometimes compared to the Baroque.  The course will be conducted as a seminar, and thus students will be expected to come to class prepared to discuss the readings. For requirements, please consult the syllabus. 

SYLLABUS

 

496. INTERNSHIP IN ART HISTORY

(By arrangement, Special permission required, Index 04539)

 

498. HONORS IN ART HISTORY

(By arrangement, Special permission required, Index 00009)

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