Home Undergraduate Courses Undergraduate courses Spring 2017

Undergraduate courses Spring 2017

101. INTRODUCTION TO ARCHITECTURE

(LIV, TTH, 1:40 – 3:00, Beck 251, Section: 01, Yanni, Index 20209)

PLEASE NOTE: CREDIT NOT GIVEN FOR THIS COURSE AND 01:082:392

This course can be used to fulfill the 21st Century and AHp areas of the Core - http://sasundergrad.rutgers.edu/academics/requirements/core

The contemporary global issue that will be analyzed in this class is the paradox presented by architecture.  All architects imagine that they are building for the future; but past architecture often seems wrong-headed or impossibly short-sighted. Architecture is a science, an art, and a business. In the twenty-first century, we live in buildings and we are surrounded by designed (and accidental) spaces. Some of the buildings we inhabit are old, some are new, but all of them carry meaning and influence behavior. Occupants of buildings push back against the intentions of architects. Green buildings contribute to environmental recuperation, while other buildings damage the environment. Real estate developers and local communities are at odds. Building new works of architecture is a powerful tool of political propaganda, and the destruction of cultural heritage is as well. We will explore architecture as an essential part of global artistic exchange. In the face of extreme population growth, environmental degradation, ideological divisions, and resource inequality, how should architects and urban planners construct for the next generation? How can historically subjected people use architecture to reassert their political and cultural agency? To explore these issues, this course will analyze buildings in their social historical contexts. Students will learn to see the built environment through new eyes, to think about their individual interactions with architecture, and to think about how designers, business people, and consumers of architecture can together create ethically sound buildings for the future.

-No memorization is necessary for the quizzes or the final.

-Non-majors welcome.

Syllabus

105. INTRODUCTION TO ART HISTORY

(LIV, TTH5, 5:00 – 6:20, TIL-258, Section: 02, Paulsen Index 13501)

This course can be used to fulfill the HST and AHp areas of the Core - http://sasundergrad.rutgers.edu/academics/requirements/core

 

This course presents an introductory overview of the history of Western art from antiquity to the late medieval period. It considers the achievements of great civilizations ranging from Egypt to the Holy Roman Empire, and focuses on a diversity of cultural and religious traditions, including, Byzantine, Islamic, and Jewish. The class examines a wide array of objects, including statues of gods and emperors, reliquaries containing saints’ bones, Greek temples and Gothic cathedrals, early synagogue decoration, devotional manuscripts, and gold-gilded altarpieces.

Emphasizing significant stylistic movements in Western Europe, this course lays the groundwork for more advanced art history courses by introducing visual analysis and other interpretative tools of art historical research. Students will also learn how the visual products of a culture relate to historical circumstances, societal values, and shifting personal and collective identities. The skills developed in this class provide important tools for navigating and interpreting media and visual representation in the twenty-first century.

Syllabus

 

105. INTRODUCTION TO ART HISTORY

(CAC, TTH8, 7:40 – 9:00, VH105, Section: 03, Instructor TBD, Index 03670)

This course can be used to fulfill the HST and AHp areas of the Core - http://sasundergrad.rutgers.edu/academics/requirements/core

This course presents an introductory overview of the history of Western art from antiquity to the late medieval period. It considers the achievements of great civilizations ranging from Egypt to the Holy Roman Empire, and focuses on a diversity of cultural and religious traditions, including, Byzantine, Islamic, and Jewish. The class examines a wide array of objects, including statues of gods and emperors, reliquaries containing saints’ bones, Greek temples and Gothic cathedrals, early synagogue decoration, devotional manuscripts, and gold-gilded altarpieces.

Emphasizing significant stylistic movements in Western Europe, this course lays the groundwork for more advanced art history courses by introducing visual analysis and other interpretative tools of art historical research. Students will also learn how the visual products of a culture relate to historical circumstances, societal values, and shifting personal and collective identities. The skills developed in this class provide important tools for navigating and interpreting media and visual representation in the twenty-first century.

 

106. INTRODUCTON TO ART HISTORY

(Cook/Douglass, MTH2, 10:55-12:15, ARH-200, Section: 25, Instructor TBD, Index 03671)

This course can be used to fulfill the HST and AHp areas of the Core - http://sasundergrad.rutgers.edu/academics/requirements/core

This course presents an introductory overview of the history of Western art from the Renaissance to the present, including the achievements of artistic giants, spanning from Leonardo Da Vinci to Kara Walker.  It covers works in a wide array of media, such as painting, sculpture, architecture, prints, photography, performance, and the moving image. Emphasizing significant stylistic movements in Europe and the Americas, this class lays the groundwork for more advanced art history courses by introducing visual analysis and other interpretative tools of art historical research. Students will also learn how the visual products of a culture relate to historical circumstances, societal values, and shifting personal and collective identities.  The skills developed in this course provide important tools for navigating and interpreting media and visual representation in the twenty-first century.

106. INTRODUCTON TO ART HISTORY

(CAC, MW8, 7:40-9:00, VH 105, Section: 30, Instructor TBD, Index 00008)

This course can be used to fulfill the HST and AHp areas of the Core - http://sasundergrad.rutgers.edu/academics/requirements/core

 

This course presents an introductory overview of the history of Western art from the Renaissance to the present, including the achievements of artistic giants, spanning from Leonardo Da Vinci to Kara Walker.  It covers works in a wide array of media, such as painting, sculpture, architecture, prints, photography, performance, and the moving image. Emphasizing significant stylistic movements in Europe and the Americas, this class lays the groundwork for more advanced art history courses by introducing visual analysis and other interpretative tools of art historical research. Students will also learn how the visual products of a culture relate to historical circumstances, societal values, and shifting personal and collective identities.  The skills developed in this course provide important tools for navigating and interpreting media and visual representation in the twenty-first century.

 

106. INTRODUCTION TO ART HISTORY

(Online, Sections 90-B6, Paul, Various Index Numbers)

This course can be used to fulfill the HST and AHp areas of the Core -

http://sasundergrad.rutgers.edu/academics/requirements/core

 

The course offers an introductory overview of the history of Western and some Non-Western art from the Renaissance to the present, including the achievements of artistic giants, spanning from Leonardo Da Vinci to Kara Walker. It covers works in a wide array of media, such as painting, sculpture, architecture, prints, photography, performance, and the moving image. Emphasizing significant stylistic movements primarily in Europe and the Americas but also globally, this class lays the groundwork for more advanced art history courses by introducing visual analysis and other interpretative tools of art historical research. Students will also learn how the visual products of a culture relate to historical circumstances, societal values, and shifting personal and collective identities. The skills developed in this course provide important tools for navigating and interpreting media and visual representation in the twenty-first century.

 

Syllabus

 

107. SURVEY OF NON-WESTERN ART

(CAC, MTH2, 9:50-11:10, VH104, Section: 01, Punj, Index 20206)

This course can be used to fulfill the HST and AHp areas of the Core -

http://sasundergrad.rutgers.edu/academics/requirements/core

 

This course will serve as an introduction to the art of the non-western world including South and Southeast Asia, China and Japan, Africa, Native America and Oceania. We will conduct a survey of visual traditions of these regions including art, sculpture, architecture, painting, ceramics and book cultures, from the pre-historic till the early modern phase. Artistic production in these regions will be studied in the context of geographical, historical, political, socio-economic and cultural conditions. Lectures and discussion will focus on developing an understanding of the art of various cultures as it evolved over time, while evaluating the role of historical changes on artistic expression and technique. This course will enable students to identify and relate specific works of art and architecture to their stylistic, historical, and social contexts. Students will also be able to articulate the cultural, religious and philosophical significance of works of art and architecture across various regions and comprehend the influence of artistic interactions and cross-cultural exchanges. There is no prerequisite for this course.

 

Syllabus

 

202. INTRODUCTION TO CONTEMPORARY ART

(CAC, MTH3, 11:30-12:50, MU301, Section: 01, Taube, Index 18968)

This course offers an introductory overview of major artists, artworks, and movements, since 1945, primarily in Europe and the United States but with some consideration of global developments. It surveys a broad range of media from painting, sculpture, photography, and video to digital technologies, installation, performance, and social practice. The class material, presented roughly chronologically and separated into movements and themes, begins with canonical art movements, such as Abstract Expressionism, Pop, and Minimalism, and then covers more recent trends, including appropriation, identity politics, relational aesthetics, and new media. Students read primary and secondary sources as well as watch videos of artists’ talks. In addition, visits to galleries and museums in New York are encouraged, and seeing the exhibition, “Guerrilla Girls: Attitude and Activism” at the Zimmerli Art Museum at Rutgers is required. Other course requirements include a midterm and a final exam; a visual analysis paper; a reading response paper; a short writing assignment focused on an artwork; and an in-class writing assignment that serves as practice for the midterm exam. 

 

Syllabus

 

214. RENAISSANCE ART IN EUROPE

(CAC, MW4, 1:10-2:30, ZAM MPR, Section: 01, McHam, Index 20207)

 

In our era many European countries have united to form a single state in terms of their monetary systems and many of their regulations. That alliance is showing signs of fraying, because in part they are running counter to more than 1500 years of independence and cultural and linguistic differences. Nowhere is that diversity more apparent than during the Renaissance, defined for our purposes here as the fourteenth through sixteenth centuries, which represents a universally recognized high point in artistic achievement all over Europe. This class will examine a series of masterpieces from the European tradition that reveal artistic forms that were intrinsic to culture north and south of the Alps, with the goal of pointing out their different features as well as their commonalities. Most of them were not considered works of art in their day, but instead visual aids to religious practice, a means of commemorating an individual, or objects to decorate or to promote pleasure. The broader objective is to create a background that leads to a better understanding of European culture in the epoch of the development of early modern culture.

Requirements

Grade distribution:

• Midterm Exam: 15 %

• Visit to the Metropolitan Museum of Art and paper on a work of art you saw there 20%

• Class Participation in Discussion: 15 %

• 2nd 3-4-page analysis paper 25 % (grade of 1st paper doesn’t count)

●Final exam: 25 %

 

Syllabus

 

215. ARTS OF DISPLAY IN BAROQUE EUROPE

(CAC, MTH2, 9:50-11:10, ZAM MPR, Section: 01, Puglisi, Index 18969)

Magnificent public squares, palaces and churches with sumptuously decorated interiors played a central role in legitimizing the beliefs and values of the triumphalist Catholic Church but also of European monarchies and fledging nation states.   This course explores the profusion of the arts of conspicuous display across Europe, 1600-1800, in a period of political and religious crisis, scientific discoveries and intellectual developments that shaped the modern world. Lectures and discussion will consider topics such as the imagery of the Catholic Church in its spiritual heart in Rome where it struggled to retain its relevance, royal iconography in the powerful courts of Spain and France, and art produced in the very different climate of the Protestant Dutch Republic, fueled by capitalism and a rising middle class. We will examine new trends such as the art market, the Academy, travel and tourism, and the formation and display of private collections and public museums. Our final weeks will follow the exportation of Baroque art and artists to the Americas and around the globe. How did Baroque art express the shifting balance of political power in Europe, national aspirations and global exchange, and Catholic vs. Protestant ideals? What role did Baroque art play in conveying collective identity, capturing everyday experience in a more and more secular society, and guiding the individual’s response to the world and beyond?

Requirements include: class attendance and participation, weekly reading assignments, 5 page Research Paper, Midterm, Final Exam, and class museum visit.

Syllabus

 

240. INTODUCTION TO MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY AFRICAN ART

(CAC, TTH4, 1:10-2:30, VH104, Section: 01, Brett-Smith, 11905)

This course will survey the world of modern and contemporary African art across the continent. Lectures and discussions will navigate the creation of huge sculptures in wood and garbage, the painting of elegant canvases in Senegal, the interwoven history of art and the fight against Apartheid in South Africa and the sophisticated photography now being created across the continent. The course will probe the destructive politics behind much of contemporary African Art, and it will include installation art, textile art and hangings. We will discuss whether contemporary African artists work in the Western art world or the African world or both, and which dominates each artist. How do modern African artists create their artistic identities and how to they use them once they are created? Who is a modern ‘African’ artist?

There will be two 3-4 page papers, a midterm and a final. The papers will analyze the cultural, political and economic context of the assigned art work. You will be challenged to relate these conditions to a reading that discusses or relates to the artwork in question. The midterm and final will follow the format of the papers.              

The course forms a part of the Core Curriculum.

Syllabus

 

251. SURVEY OF RUSSIAN ART – PART II

(CAC, MW5, 2:50-4:10, ZAM-EDR, Section: 01, Rosenfeld, 15839)

This course will illustrate the development of Russian art and architecture from the time of Peter the Great (1672-1725) to the present. It will treat Russian contributions within the context of international art history, as well as genres and forms specific to Russia such as parsuna and folk prints known as lubki. The first part of the course focuses on the development of Russian painting, sculpture, and architecture in the 18th and 19th centuries. It also examines cultural and historical links between Russian and European art. The focus in the second part of the course is on Russian and Soviet modernism, from the art of the Russian avant-garde movement of the 1910s and 1920s to nonconformist art of the 1960s-80s. Attention will therefore be paid to the practice and theory of artists such as Natalia Goncharova, Mikhail Larionov, Kazimir Malevich, Vladimir Tatlin, Liubov Popova, and Aleksander Rodchenko within the cultural and political context of Russia just before and immediately after the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917.

Although the Russian avant-garde will be treated as a consistent historical development, every attempt will be made to emphasize the diversity and plurality of its many aesthetic and philosophical systems, focusing on the fundamental relationship between artists of the Russian avant-garde and the traditional artistic heritage of Russia. Several lectures will be devoted to official Soviet art—Socialist Realism. The course will conclude with an extended analysis of Soviet Nonconformist art during the Cold War period between 1956 and 1986—from Khrushchev’s cultural “thaw” to Gorbachev’s glasnost and perestroika. Some major issues and developments in contemporary post-Soviet art will be also discussed.

Attendance                                                                                                        10%

Participation in class discussions                                                                20%

Midterm exam                                                                                                  30%

Take-home final exam or final paper                                                       40 %

Syllabus

306. ROMAN ART

(CAC, MTH3, 11:30-12:50, ZAM MPR, Section: 01, Paulsen, 15122)

This course examines the art and architecture of Rome and the Roman Empire in its social and cultural context, from its Hellenic and native Italic beginnings up to the end of the Pagan era. There will be 2 exams and a research paper, all required to pass the course. Pre-requisites: Introduction to Art History 105.

Textbook: Fred S. Kleiner. A History of Roman Art.  Belmont, CA: Thomson Wadsworth, 2007.

Syllabus

310. THE HIGH RENAISSANCE IN ITALY

(CAC, TTH5, 2:50-4:10, ZAM MPR, Section: 01, Paul, Index 18970)

The High Renaissance is the era that went from Leonardo da Vinci to Michelangelo and from Raphael to Titian. These are often considered the greatest artists of all times and this seminar will analyze why this is the case. We will carefully discuss many masterpieces, including Leonardo’s Last Supper and Mona Lisa, Michelangelo’s David and Sistine Chapel, Raphael’s School of Athens and Transfiguration and Titian’s Venus of Urbino and Pietà. We will study how fierce rivalry motivated these artists to challenge and ultimately outdo each other with their opposed approaches to art. We will see how they struggled with their patrons, be it popes, princes, kings and how they arranged themselves with the differing interests of humanists and the Church. The representation of women in the Renaissance will be a special focus and in particular Titian’s undermining of the misogynist constitution of his time. The class will end with the waning of the Renaissance and the onslaught of the Counter-Reformation, which led to one of the darkest chapters in the history of art: Paolo Veronese’s Inquisition trial. Students taking this seminar will practice visual analysis and get an introduction into art theory and Mannerism. They will familiarize themselves with the highlights of sixteenth-century Italian art and thus gain an in-depth understanding of one the groundbreaking periods in the history of humanity in which the basis to our (post-)modern society was laid.

A field trip to the Metropolitan Museum of Art, NYC is part of the class.

Requirements

one midterm (20%), one 6-7 page research paper (30%), one final (25%), participation/attendence in class (25%).

Syllabus

322. SURVEY OF JAPANESE ART

(CAC, MH3, 11:30-12:50, VH 104, Section: 01, Bower, Index 18971)

In this chronologically organized class ranging from the pre-historic to early modern period (ca. 10,000 BCE-ca.1868 CE) the student is introduced to the art of Japan with an emphasis on those artworks in each period especially valued by the Japanese themselves. Attention is paid to the influence exerted upon Japan by other cultures (China, Korea, and more recently Europe) and discussion will be undertaken about what in particular the Japanese consider distinctive about their art and culture. By the end of this class a student will appreciate and recognize Japanese art within the larger context of East Asian and to a lesser extent World civilization and the student will also possess the knowledge and analytical skills to independently further research Japanese art.

This is primarily a lecture class, but student input is encouraged. Class handouts will be distributed in class and posted also online via the Sakai Online Learning System as will also Powerpoint context and key images for review and study prior to examinations. Grading is based on in-class tests and a short museum-visit-based paper------dates and number of these will be determined by the Rutgers Academic Calendar and detailed in the Final Syllabus. Class Attendance and Participation as well as Improvement in Performance will also be taken into account in determining the Final Grade. Required Text: Japanese Art by Joan Stanley Baker; Recommended Text (for those people with strong interest in Japan): History of Japanese Art by Penelope Mason, Second Edition Revised by Donald Dinwiddie---copies will be available through the Rutgers Barnes and Noble Bookstore.

Syllabus

 

355. FRENCH ARCHITECTURE 1515-1750

(CAC, MW5, 2:50-4:10, MU 301, Section: 01, Marder, Index 18973)


This course will review the most important developments, monuments, architects and patrons in French architecture during the period 1500-1700. It will prepare students to understand and enjoy all of French art of the period, dwelling specifically on the built environment of the time, with emphasis on the sites that a well-informed visitor can see, and rulers who dominate history.  Thus, we pay special attention to works in Paris and the Loire Valley, to the achievements of Francis I, Henry IV and Louis XIV,and to monumental sites like Versailles and its gardens.

Syllabus

 

375. RENAISSANCE AND BAROQUE ARCHITECTURE

(CAC, MH3, 11:30-12:50, ZAM EDR, Section: 01, Marder, Index 18974)

This course attempts to isolate the most significant architects, buildings, periods, and styles in the era 1400-1600 in Italy.  We will review the reasons why Brunelleschi is considered the father of Renaissance architecture, how Bramante's High Renaissance differs from its roots in earlier times, and how Palladio became a distinctive force in the design of villas and palaces.  We also consider the achievements of architects like Bernini, Borromini, and other who made the Roman Baroque period so significant for later architecture.  Much emphasis will be on the city of Rome, where Rutgers a summer program and where virtually every ambitious European architect went to  study in the years between 1400 and 1800.

Syllabus

377. GOTHIC

(CAC, TTH4, 1:10-2:30, ZAM MPR, Section: 01, Weigert, Index 18975)

This course is cross-listed with 01:510:392:01

From the eighteenth-century gothic novel to today’s Goth look, “gothic” has been associated with the macabre, horror, or a rebellious subculture. This course returns to the historical origins of the style known as “gothic,” focusing on artistic production in Northern Europe from the mid-twelfth through the early fifteenth century. It examines architecture, sculpture, stained glass, manuscript illumination, ivories, textiles, and metalwork within the religious, social, political and economic contexts in which they were made and seen. We begin with an examination of the Gothic cathedral, turn to art and urbanism in the city of Paris, and then to art produced for the courts and members of the laity. We will conclude with a discussion of gothic revivals in architecture, cinema, and fashion. Topics to be explored include: liturgy and ceremony, mysticism and devotion, pictorial narrative, the construction of the “other,” lay literacy, attitudes towards death, courtly love, and new notions of seeing and the self.

Learning Goals:

By the end of this course all students should be able to:

1) describe the engineering and construction of a Gothic church.

2) identify the components of a Gothic manuscript.

3) characterize Gothic style.

4) understand some of the significant cultural, political, economic, and religious transformations that contributed to the development of Gothic.

5)recognize the inheritance of Gothic today.

Requirements and Grading:

-Attendance at all lectures and participation in all discussions, for days designated as discussion days (*) each student will submit one question on Sakai by noon on that day: 15%

-two group presentations, for which all members of the group will receive the same grade (Thurs. 2/9 and Tues. 3/28): 20%

-mid-term examination, Thurs. 2/23: 15%

-One five-minute pod cast, focusing on a work of art of your choice at the Cloisters Museum (due Tues. 4/11), and one three-page paper on the same work of art, due in class Thurs. 4/13: 20%

-Final examination: date to be announced: 30%

All readings and powerpoint presentations will be posted on Sakai.

Prerequisites: 082:105 is recommended, but not required.

Syllabus

382. HISTORY OF PHOTOGRAPHY FROM 1830-1900

(CAC, MW5, 2:50-4:10, ZAM MPR, Section: 01, Zervigon, Index 18976)

Overview of the social, cultural, and art history of photography from circa 1800 to 1900. Students will complete a middle-length writing assignment that pose critical questions about early photography in historical context, a short midterm exam, and a final exam. The course includes one visit to the Zimmerli Art Museum and one field trip to a photography collection in New York City. Attendance and active participation are required.

Syllabus

396. IMPRESSIONISM

(CAC, MW4, 1:10-2:30, ZAM EDR, Section: 01, Sidlauskas, 05245)

This course explores the meanings and myths of Impressionism and Post-Impressionism. Artists discussed will include Manet, Monet, Degas, Renoir, Cassatt, Morisot, Pissarro, Cézanne, Sargent, Gauguin, Van Gogh, Munch, and Toulouse-Lautrec. Representative works will be considered in the context of their social, historical, and artistic conditions. Among the topics to be addressed are the representation of Paris and its café society, the politics of the female body, fashion and modernity, and the contested concepts of modernism and primitivism. Rather than an exhaustive survey, this class will consider a relatively small number of key works by each artist. The lectures will be supplemented by critical readings that approach the course material from diverse perspectives. Course requirements include a midterm and a final exam; a visual analysis paper requiring a trip to the Metropolitan Museum of Art or the Zimmerli Art Museum; a reading response paper; and two short writing assignments.

403. APPROACHES TO ART HISTORY

(CAC, T23, 9:50-12:50, VH 001, Section 01, Paul, Index 20208)

This seminar focuses on basic types of art-historical method. Some meetings concentrate on a single author who exemplifies a particular approach. Others are devoted to important debates concerning conceptual bases of the discipline and/or theoretical models relevant to it. The purpose is to provide students with the basic tools of visual analysis and with an overview of the history of the discipline.

Syllabus

441.01 STUDIES IN CHAPS: CULTURE, PRESERVATION AND POLITICS IN THE MIDDLE EAST

(CAC, M67, 4:30-7:30, VH 001, Section: 01, Kahlaoui, Index 15459)

This course is cross listed with 16:082:593:01 and 01:506:301:01

 

The Middle East is one of the richest archeological regions in the world. Yet, ironically, military conflicts aimed at establishing stability in the area have contributed to the deterioration of cultural artifacts and sites at an alarming rate. Military action, political indifference, and a vacuum of knowledge – linguistic, artistic, political, and cultural – have endangered the possibilities for preserving the essence of Middle Eastern art and archaeology and the roots of western European tradition. This course is about war and cultural heritage, politics and preservation as the new realities of our future. This course begins with a review of similar situations of war and art, from napoleon to World War II and Vietnam (“we had to destroy it in order to save it”). Our work then moves quickly to a discussion of Middle Eastern art and archaeology, including the sack of the Iraq museum in Baghdad and the looting of sites in the countryside throughout the region. Half of the course is devoted to understanding both the art and archaeology of the region, and the other half is devoted to tracing their fate and their future under the challenge of present circumstances. This course will answer two questions. The first is: what do we need to know about the art history of Egypt, Iraq, Iran, Syria, and Afghanistan?  The second is:  what are the threats to its survival for future generations?  The course targets art history and CHAPS students. It will emphasize both visual approaches and preservation practices, and their relation to the respective social environments.


Requirements will include informal discussion of common readings, oral reports on specific issues, and a 15-page research paper.

Syllabus

 

441.02 STUDIES IN CHAPS: CEMETERIES, MONUMENTS AND MEMORIALS

(CAC, W67, 4:30-7:30, VH 001, Section: 01, Woodhouse-Beyer, Index 16580)

This course is cross listed with 16:082:594:01 and 01:506:391:02

This cultural heritage course explores the history and material culture of the memorialization of individuals, social groups, and historic events through time, cultures, and landscapes. Our course material will include local, national, and global case studies and examples drawn from the fields of cultural heritage, cultural resource management, historic preservation, archaeology, anthropology, history, art history, death studies, landscape architecture, and the contemporary world. Why and how do we choose to remember/memorialize some individuals and events over others? What does the form and design of cemeteries, monuments, and monuments reveal about communities, culture, politics, and cultural/historical memory? Which memorial sites and spaces stay secular – and which become sacred ground? How and when do acts of memorialization become vehicles for mediating and reinterpreting the past? How and why do some sites associated with the dead and historic events become contested ground while others are forgotten? What is the role and purpose of “dark tourism” and studies of “negative heritage” as part of remembering and forgetting in the contemporary world?

Attendance (includes participation/article introductions) 20%; Case Study Report 1 20%; Case Study Report 2 20%; Cemetery/Monument/or Memorial paper 20%; Research Paper 20%                   

No prerequisites are required to join our course – undergraduates/graduates from all disciplines are welcome!

Syllabus

 

442.01 ADVANCED TOPICS: CHAPS

(CAC, TH23, 09:50-12:50, VH 001, Rico, Index 07293)

This course is cross listed with 16:082:603:01 and 01:506:391:03

This course offers a critical overview of the variety of methods that are used in the identification, documentation and management of cultural heritage. Students will engage with the different types of heritage sources and disciplines that define this subject of study in all its diversity, in order to discuss methods descriptively and critically. Each seminar we will consider the documentation of heritage from a different disciplinary vantage point and discuss the intimate relationship between methods, theories and standards used in cultural heritage. This course offers a venue and support for students to discuss and define more robust methodologies in their research papers and dissertations.

Syllabus

 

448. INTERNSHIP IN HISTORIC PRESERVATION

(Hours by arrangement, by permission of the CHAPS director, See department staff for special permission number, Index 04764)

 

483. FROM TEXT TO IMAGE IN JAPANESE ART

(CAC, MTH2, 9:50-11:10, AB 1100, Wakabayashi, Index 20320)    

This course is cross listed with 01:565:483:01. Credit will not be given for both this course and 01:565:483:01.

 Explores the profound influence of classical literature on the arts of Japan, especially painting. Analysis of the historical and literary meaning of the literary works; investigation of the fusion of text and image.

 

492.01 CAPSTONE: ARTISTIC MAKEOVERS

(CAC, W45, 1:10-4:10, VH001, Puglisi, 13331)

 

This seminar examines the phenomenon of radical stylistic transformations in early modern art. While most Renaissance artists created artistic styles following an organic development from early to mature to late, striking exceptions exist of those few who unexpectedly changed course in mid-career. Radical stylistic change spiked in the Baroque when artistic experimentation increasingly came to characterize practice, wherein two or more stylistic modes might be deployed, even concurrently. Weekly class discussions will focus on major painters who changed direction dramatically in the middle of their careers or alternated between different styles, among them El Greco, Annibale Carracci and Ludovico Carracci, Orazio Gentileschi, Guercino, Guido Reni, Simon Vouet, Gerrit Honthorst, Nicolas Poussin and Bernardo Strozzi. Our investigation will consider a range of possible factors driving style change from personal circumstances to external factors, such as the nature of the commission or medium, patronage expectations, shifts in taste and theoretical attitudes, and the demands of the emerging art market. Critical questions to be addressed include how these “makeovers” differ from the standard narrative of artistic development, old age style, period styles, and regional styles. Students will be encouraged to develop in consultation with me a final research project on an artist’s stylistic change in their own field of interest (Renaissance, Baroque, Nineteenth Century, Modern or Contemporary). Requirements: 1) reading weekly assignments posted on sakai and being prepared to participate in seminar discussions, 2) brief presentation of one of the weekly reading assignments and leading class discussion on it, 3) a 15-minute oral report on the approved research project, and 4) the write-up in the form of a 12-15 page research paper due at the end of the semester.

 

492.02 CAPSTONE: PRIMITIVISM IN THE LATE 19TH AND 20TH CENTURY

(CAC, T23, 9:50-12:50, ALSEM, Brett-Smith, 19070)

 

This course will explore the Western fascination with the artistic traditions of Africa, pre-Columbian MesoAmerica, Melanesia and Polynesia. It will review the visual borrowings that are so familiar to us from paintings like Picasso’s “Demoiselles D’Avignon,” but it will also try to go beyond the visual to an understanding of the conceptual similarities or differences that lie behind these borrowings.

After Gauguin and Picasso, we will try to articulate what the Dadaists were trying to communicate in their imitation of African sounds, masks and dances before progressing to the Surrealists and their ‘high fashion’ sense of African Art. Along the way we will examine the beginning of collecting African and Oceanic materials. Finally, and if we have time, we will discuss the impact of Native American Arts on Max Ernst and then the Abstract Expressionist of the 1950s.

Each student will be expected to give a visual presentation in class (about ½ hour) and to write a substantial research paper. The class is open to both undergraduates and graduate students. Undergraduates must be majors in their junior or senior year.

My email is This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. if you wish to send me questions about the content of the course. I am delighted if graduate students want to take the course and would love it if you would email me something about your career goals.  

494. INDIVIDUAL STUDY IN ART HISTORY

(Special permission required, Index 00009)

 

496. INTERNSHIP IN ART HISTORY

(Special permission required, Index 04726)

498. HONORS IN ART HISTORY

(Special permission required, Index 00010)

499. ADVANCED SEMINAR IN ART HISTORY

(Special permission required, Index 05244)

Contact Us

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71 Hamilton Street
New Brunswick, NJ, 08901


P  848-932-7041

F 732-932-1261
departmental email