Home Undergraduate Courses Undergraduate courses - fall 2016

Undergraduate courses - fall 2016

105. INTRODUCTION TO ART HISTORY

(CAC, TTh4, 1:10 – 2:30, VH105, Section: 01, Kenfield, Index 00013)

This course can be used to fulfill the HST and AHp areas of the Core - http://sasundergrad.rutgers.edu/academics/requirements/core

This course presents an introductory overview of the history of Western art from antiquity to the late medieval period. It considers the achievements of great civilizations ranging from Egypt to the Holy Roman Empire, and focuses on a diversity of cultural and religious traditions, including, Byzantine, Islamic, and Jewish. The class examines a wide array of objects, including statues of gods and emperors, reliquaries containing saints’ bones, Greek temples and Gothic cathedrals, early synagogue decoration, devotional manuscripts, and gold-gilded altarpieces.

Emphasizing significant stylistic movements in Western Europe, this course lays the groundwork for more advanced art history courses by introducing visual analysis and other interpretative tools of art historical research. Students will also learn how the visual products of a culture relate to historical circumstances, societal values, and shifting personal and collective identities. The skills developed in this class provide important tools for navigating and interpreting media and visual representation in the twenty-first century.

Course requirements will be a short (3-5 pp.) personal response paper on an object chosen by the professor in a local museum, two hour exams, and a final exam.

105. INTRODUCTION TO ART HISTORY

(LIV, TTH6, 5:00 – 6:20, TIL-258, Section: 02, Ong and Pierce, Index 00014)

This course can be used to fulfill the HST and AHp areas of the Core - http://sasundergrad.rutgers.edu/academics/requirements/core

This course presents an introductory overview of the history of Western art and culture from antiquity through the late medieval period. The cultures to be considered are Egypt, Mesopotamia, the Aegean Bronze Age, Greece, Rome - including ancient Jewish art, Byzantium, Islam, and the cultural phases of medieval Western Europe, including and ending with the Gothic period. Students will learn how the visual products of each culture relate to that culture’s historical circumstances, societal values, and shifting personal and collective identities. The skills developed in this class are applicable to the art of any culture, providing important tools for navigating and interpreting media and visual representation in the twenty-first century, and they form the foundation for more advanced art history courses by introducing techniques of visual analysis and other interpretative tools of art historical research. Students will attend two weekly lectures of 80 minutes.

Course requirements will be a short (3-5 pp.) personal response paper on an object chosen by the professor in a local museum, two hour exams, and a final exam.

105. INTRODUCTION TO ART HISTORY        

(Cook/Douglass, MTH2, 10:55-12:15, Section: 05, ARH 200, Puglisi, 00015)

This course can be used to fulfill the HST and AHp areas of the Core -http://sasundergrad.rutgers.edu/academics/requirements/core

This course presents an introductory overview of the history of Western art from antiquity to the late medieval period. It considers the achievements of great civilizations ranging from Egypt to the Holy Roman Empire, and focuses on a diversity of cultural and religious traditions, including, Byzantine, Islamic, and Jewish. The class examines a wide array of objects, including statues of gods and emperors, reliquaries containing saints’ bones, Greek temples and Gothic cathedrals, early synagogue decoration, devotional manuscripts, and gold-gilded altarpieces.

Emphasizing significant stylistic movements in Western Europe, this course lays the groundwork for more advanced art history courses by introducing visual analysis and other interpretative tools of art historical research. Students will also learn how the visual products of a culture relate to historical circumstances, societal values, and shifting personal and collective identities. The skills developed in this class provide important tools for navigating and interpreting media and visual representation in the twenty-first century.

Requirements include:

Class Attendance

Short Museum Paper

Short Critical Reading Response

Midterm

Final

Syllabus

105. INTRODUCTION TO ART HISTORY        

(CAC, MW8, 7:40-9:00, VH 105, Section: 07, Paulsen, 04740)

This course presents an introductory overview of the history of Western art and culture from antiquity through the late medieval period. The cultures to be considered are Egypt, Mesopotamia, the Aegean Bronze Age, Greece, Rome - including ancient Jewish art, Byzantium, Islam, and the cultural phases of medieval Western Europe, including and ending with the Gothic period. Students will learn how the visual products of each culture relate to that culture’s historical circumstances, societal values, and shifting personal and collective identities. The skills developed in this class are applicable to the art of any culture, providing important tools for navigating and interpreting media and visual representation in the twenty-first century, and they form the foundation for more advanced art history courses by introducing techniques of visual analysis and other interpretative tools of art historical research. Students will attend two weekly lectures of 80 minutes.

Course requirements will be a short (3-5 pp.) personal response paper on an object chosen by the professor in a local museum, two hour exams, and a final exam.

106. INTODUCTON TO ART HISTORY

(CAC, TH8, 7:40-9:00, VH 105, Section: 03, Martynyuk, 00016)

This course presents an introductory overview of the history of Western art from the Renaissance to the present, including the achievements of artistic giants, spanning from Leonardo Da Vinci to Kara Walker. It covers works in a wide array of media, such as painting, sculpture, architecture, prints, photography, performance, and the moving image. Emphasizing significant stylistic movements in Europe and the Americas, this class lays the groundwork for more advanced art history courses by introducing visual analysis and other interpretative tools of art historical research. Students will also learn how the visual products of a culture relate to historical circumstances, societal values, and shifting personal and collective identities. The skills developed in this course provide important tools for navigating and interpreting media and visual representation in the twenty-first century.

118. LOOKING AT TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY WORLD HISTORY

(Online, Weigert, Section 90, Index 13812) (Cross listed with History: 01:506:118:90)

An interdisciplinary examination of the role of the visual in both our daily lives and in the way we remember the past. Taught through a series of topics ranging from war and violence and gender to work and play. Note: there is a $100 online support fee.

Syllabus

253. CONTEMPORARY PHOTOGRAPHY

(CAC, MW4, 1:10-2:30, ZAM-EDR, Section: 01, Kruglinski, 19333)

This course will explore a broad range of contemporary photographs from around the world and ask what typifies the medium’s aesthetic practice and everyday popularity. How does a medium invented in the mid-nineteenth century function in the contemporary world? What have artists photographically and visually explored since the turn of the twenty-first century, and are there particular methods that they utilize to create evocative photographs? Can inventive new trends and ideologies be identified in the photographic practice of recent decades, or is photography forever replaying its history in new technical clothing? What does it mean to create, interpret, collect, catalogue, exhibit, and publish photographic images in the last twenty years? What questions can we ask about contemporary photography as an art, science, technology, social practice, communications medium, and cultural discourse?

With these questions in mind, we will pay particular attention to the impact of digital technologies on the medium. We will examine how digital editing, for example, affected our expectations about a photograph’s relationship to the reality it generally purports to represent. Our discussions and readings will also explore how the radical democratization of photography through cell phone cameras, viral photography, and social media contribute to new aesthetic and cultural trends, such as citizen journalism, memes, and photo-bombs. Additionally, we will focus on investigating the way that contemporary digital photographic strategies express and reflect the post-colonial intersectionality of life in our global world. As case studies, we will explore our personal use of photography to seek answers to these questions. Students are expected to respond critically to the questions in this description, as well as to the texts and images discussed in class. In addition to close readings, discussions, and slide lectures that focus on the seminal texts and works from recent photographic history, students are required to take a midterm and a final exam, as well as complete a visual analysis paper and a final research paper.

255. HISTORY OF JEWISH ART

(CAC, TTH5, 2:50-4:10, MH 115, Section: 01, Shandler, 19334) (Cross listed with 01:563:226:01)

An overview of Jewish engagements with visual art from ancient times to the present in communities around the world, including synagogue architecture, ritual objects, fine art, photography, and public monuments. Topics addressed include the role of art in addressing communal ritual, personal spirituality, modernity, immigrant life, revolution, anti-Semitism, Holocaust remembrance.

No prerequisites.

293. IMAGES OF THE WORLD: A WORLD HISTORY OF MAPS

(CAC, MW6, 4:30-5:50, VH 104, Section: 01, Kahlaoui, 15066)

This course focuses on the ways different cultures throughout time represented space visually, notably in the format of maps. It will use twelve of the most notable cartographic works produced since 700 BC as key images to introduce the rich legacy of spatial representation. Each map represented its time’s world view and/or influenced the perception of the peoples of a particular culture and moment in history. We will use as a starting point each week a specific moment in time and location in reference to our key image. The course will not argue for a “progressive scientific” history of maps but rather that humanity needed to see earth in different ways given various points in time and space. Thus it explores how viewing space can be shaped following a complex context in which different competing factors are involved. We will use Jerry Brotton’s “A History of the World in 12 Maps” as a textbook (Penguin Books, 2014) and other readings, which will be posted on sakai.

Examinations and assignments:

a. Mid-term: (30 %)

A 1 1/2 hour examination consisting of two parts:

1. Identifications, consisting of the name, date, location, importance of the image.

2. Comparisons. Short essays introduced through the mechanism of a comparison of two items taken from the material of the course.

b. The final examination (two hours): (40 %)

The examination will consist of three parts:

1. Identifications (5)

2. Comparisons (3)

3. Essay question, chosen from a list of three broad questions.

In general, the second part of the course will be favored over the first, although your firm knowledge of the first part may be very helpful in formulating the answers.      

c. Attendance/Participation in class and quizzes (30%): quizzes (1 to 3 quizzes will be announced a week in advance) will be brief (15 min.) and touch on specific images or articles.

303. ART OF THE ANCIENT NEAR EAST

(CAC, MH3, 11:30-12:50, VH 104, Section: 01, Shafer, 19335)

This course will survey the art and architecture of the oldest cultures in the world, the ‘cradle of civilization,’ and home to Gilgamesh, Hammurabi, Ishtar, and other figures of myth and legend. The ‘ancient Near East’ comprises the ancient cultures of our modern-day Middle East, from the 5th millennium to the 5th century BCE. Students will study the material culture of the early Mesopotamians, the Akkadian and Assyrian empires, the Hittites, the Canaanites and Phoenicians, and Babylon, among others. They will learn how to decipher intriguing visual imagery from a range of contexts, from the walls of large-scale palace and temple architecture to the small-scale surfaces of personal items such as cylinder seals. Particular emphasis will be given to the political, social, and religious contests of these monuments, which will be illuminated further by ancient cuneiform texts in translation. Finally, this course will also critique the confluence of contemporary politics and excavation, collection, and re-presentation of these monuments and their cultures. Grades will be based upon attendance/participation (10%), a mid-term examination (20%), student presentation (20%), final exam (30%), and medium-length research papers on a museum object of choice.

Syllabus

308. ITALY, 1250-1400: THE HINGE BETWEEN MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE

(CAC, TH4, 1:10-2:30, ZAM-MPR, Section: 01, McHam, 19336)

This course provides a survey of Italian art and architecture from the mid-13th century until 1400. The course will investigate the beginnings of the move away from an otherworldly religious art and the beginnings of a humanized, expressive interpretation. It will also deal with the ways in which art and architecture served to construct civic identity and pride in the peninsula’s independent city-states, as well as to meet the objectives of its patrons, whether male or female, secular or religious.

Syllabus

320. ISLAMIC ART AND ARCHITECTURE

(CAC, MW4, 1:10-2:30, VH 104, Section: 01, Kahlaoui, 10421)

This survey course will study the major characteristics of Islamic visual culture while classifying its chronologically according to its overall cultural and political context. The course will be taught in 4 parts. We will begin by discussing general concepts and get acquainted with some basic notions in Islamic culture and history with regards to the visual arts.

The course is divided chronologically into four parts: First Part (600-750 AD) after an introduction and discussing basic concepts, we will study the foundation and the formation of the “early imperial” style during the Umayyad period. The Second Part (750-1000): we will study the characteristics of the “early imperial” style under later empires up the end of the first Millennium during the dynasties of the Abbasids, the Umayyads of Spain, and the Fatimids. The Third Part (1000-1500) will cover a new historical phase during which new geopolitics (the emergence of “princely states” instead of the early empires) created a new context for the creation of the visual culture. Finally the Fourth Part (1500-1700) will cover two periods the resurrection of imperial visual culture with three empires: the Ottomans, the Safawids, and the Mughals. However, the course will emphasize the early period (parts 1 and 2 mainly) since it is the foundational phase of many lasting characteristics of Islamic visual culture.

Readings, “key texts” and “key images” will help us go through all these phases. “Key texts” are short translated texts that are supposed to give an inside textual look that would help understand some aspects of the visual culture of each period; “key images” are intended to provide a generic representation of the visual culture of each period and serve as introductory visual samples to the series of images that will be the backbone of the course.

NOTE on Resources:

Readings: There is no text book for this class but there will be readings mostly available online assigned for each topic of the course.

Online Resources: The course syllabus, all ppt. presentations, all readings, “key texts,” and “key images” will be available online (sakai). A major source of images and articles especially for Islamic architecture is ArchNet website (www.archnet.org). I will present the class with few videos along the course taken mainly from the open internet (Google Videos most likely). I will post the links subsequently.

Examinations and assignments:

a. Mid-term: (30 %)

A 1 1/2 hour examination consisting of two parts:

1. Identifications, consisting of the name, date, location, importance of the monument or object.

2. Comparisons. Short essays introduced through the mechanism of a comparison of two items taken from the material of the course.

b. The final examination (two hours): (40 %)

The examination will consist of three parts:

1. Identifications (5)

2. Comparisons (3)

3. Essay question, chosen from a list of three broad questions.

In general, the second part of the course will be favored over the first, although your firm knowledge of the first part may be very helpful in formulating the answers.

                                            

c. Attendance/Participation in class and quizzes (30%): quizzes (1 to 3 quizzes will be announced a week in advance) will be brief (15 min.) and touch on specific images or articles.

357. ART AND POWER: POLITICAL PROPAGANDA IN THE VISUAL ARTS, ARCHITECTURE, THEATER, AND FILM DURING THE SOVIET ERA, 1917-1991

(CAC, TH5, 2:50-4:10, ZAM-EDR, Section: 01, Rosenfeld, 15505) (Cross listed with 01:195:316:01 and 01:860:336:01)

Russian art of the Soviet era affords a unique vantage point from which to explore the intersection of art and politics, the changing dynamics of Soviet power, and artists’ responses to—and reactions against—the notion of art as an instrument of political propaganda.

Roughly twenty years after the fall of the Berlin Wall and the end of the Cold War, the art produced in Russia from 1917 to 1953 is still widely regarded as the paradigm of radical political art. The years surrounding the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917 witnessed an astonishing array of avant-garde art movements—Suprematism, Constructivism, and Productivism, among others. The mid- to late 1920s and 1930s saw the rise of so-called “Heroic Realism” and the Soviet government’s increasing control over artistic production, culminating in the announcement in 1934 of Socialist Realism as the official style of Soviet art. Art and Power will address the interplay between changing cultural policy and the shifts in the styles, imagery, and messages of Russian/Soviet art during this landmark period.

Following Joseph Stalin’s death in 1953, the monolith of totalitarian culture began to erode—a process that ultimately led to the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. Starting in the mid-1950s, artists began exploring alternate forms of self-expression in opposition to Socialist Realism, incorporating subjects and art forms banned during the Stalin era. The course will address the breathtaking range of these alternate forms of artistic expression—which collectively came to be known as “unofficial” or “nonconformist art”—as well as their relationship to official art.

In its exploration of these issues, Art and Power will touch on the broad spectrum of artistic media, including painting, sculpture, posters, children’s book design and illustration, architecture, mass festivals, theater, and film.

Learning objectives:

You will become familiar with a specific body of creative work, produced in Russia from the period immediately after the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917 to the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991. We will consider issues such as the cult of personality, art-world debates on realism versus abstraction, and developments like Lenin’s Plan for Monumental Propaganda. Emphasis will be placed on the historical, ideological, and aesthetic contexts of the artworks examined.

Course requirements:

You are expected to be present at all meetings, including all museum sessions. More than three absences will count against your grade. In order to understand the lectures and to prepare for the discussions, it is essential that you complete all the reading listed for each topic before coming to class. You will be also expected to explore the Riabov Collection of Russian art and the Norton and Nancy Dodge Collection of Nonconformist Art from the Soviet Union; some classes may be taught in the galleries of the Zimmerli Art Museum.

No knowledge of Russian is required.

Assignments and grades:

Your grade will be based on your attendance, your participation in class discussions, as well as on the “reading response paper” (5 pages) and final paper (10-15 pages, typed and double-spaced; due after the end of the semester) on a topic discussed with the Professor. Additional guidelines for the essay will be distributed separately.

368. MODERN AMERICAN ART

(CAC, MH3, 11:30-12:50, ZAM-MPR, Section: 01, Taube, 19337)

This course will explore painting, sculpture, and photography produced by American artists at home and abroad from the 1820s to the mid-1940s, a period that encompasses the rise to prominence and institutionalization of art in the United States. Topics will include the role of antebellum art in shaping national identity; the portrayal of the Civil War; the shifting representation of race during a time of nation building and immigration; the late nineteenth-century embrace of a cosmopolitan spirit; The Armory Show and the development of Modernism; and the search for roots and artistic heritage during a period of rapid modernization in the 1920s and 1930s. We will address representative works by both canonical and lesser known artists, such as William Sidney Mount, Lily Martin Spencer, Frederic Edwin Church, Matthew Brady, Winslow Homer, Thomas Eakins, John Singer Sargent, Henry Ossawa Tanner, Augustus Saint Gaudens, Robert Henri, Georgia O’Keeffe, Alfred Stieglitz, Thomas Hart Benton, and Jacob Lawrence. Rather than an exhaustive survey, this class will consider a relatively small number of key works by each artist. The lectures will be supplemented by critical readings that approach the course material from diverse perspectives. Course requirements include a midterm and a final exam; a visual analysis paper requiring a trip to the Metropolitan Museum of Art; a reading response paper; and two short writing assignments.

Syllabus

374. ROMANESQUE AND GOTHIC ART

(CAC, MW5, 2:50-4:10, ZAM – MPR, Section: 01, Paulsen, 19338)

This course examines the role of art and architecture in the medieval world, and how it intersected with the changing concepts of identity in northern Europe. The art of northern Europe during the Middle Ages was affected by many elements; some of the themes explored in this course include personal vs. institutional spirituality, the interaction between church and state politics, the influence of interactions with the broader Mediterranean world, and the role of economics in encouraging artistic production.

Requirements will include two exams and a research paper.

387. ROCOCO TO REALISM

(CAC, MW4, 1:10-2:30, ZAM-MPR, Section: 01, Taube, 05602)

This course will focus on the emergence and development of a realist approach to art beginning in the late eighteenth- and continuing into the nineteenth century. It will explore broad artistic movements and styles, such as Rococo, Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Orientalism, and Realism, as well as representative works by European painters, photographers, printmakers, and sculptors, including Boucher, Fragonard, Vigée-Le Brun, David, Canova, Delacroix, Géricault, Goya, Blake, Friedrich, Constable, Turner, Gérôme, Courbet, Daumier, Millais, Menzel, Daguerre, and Talbot. Among the topics to be addressed are the changing attitudes toward idealism and realism; the politics of the body from the fall of the revolutionary hero to the rise of the ordinary citizen; landscape and its embodiment of personal and national identity; the impact of science and technology on the making and interpretation of art; and the representation of race as informed by racial theories and anxieties. Course requirements consist of class attendance and participation, weekly reading assignments, two short writing assignments, a reading response paper, a museum paper requiring a trip to the Metropolitan Museum of Art, a midterm, and a final exam.

Syllabus

428. THE MODERN CITY

(CAC, T67, 4:30-7:30, VH 104, Section: 01, Bzdaks, 19339)

Course Description:

This course will explore the tension between architectural progress and tradition, which has defined modern Italy from Reunification in 1860 to the present. A range of late 19th and 20th century architectural movements will be studied, with a focus on the design capitals of Rome, Milan, Turin, Florence, and Naples. The mutually beneficial relationship of industrial and architectural design, the use of architecture as a tool to create civic identity, and the influence of design journals on the architectural profession will be highlighted. The course will conclude with a discussion of the pressures of globalization on Italy’s major civic centers, as well as the role of Italian architects on the international stage.

Learning Objectives:

• Ability to identify and analyze stylistic elements of Italian architecture

• Understanding of basic concepts and vocabulary related to modernism, modernist architecture and twentieth-century Italian culture      

• Comprehensive understanding of how Italian architects and architecture are reflections of broader cultural, political and sociological ideas

• Enhanced ability to integrate knowledge of Italian Modern Architecture into broader framework of International Modern movements                          

Course Policies:

Students are expected to attend each of the 14 scheduled classes. Please notify the Instructors if you plan to miss a class. Grades will be assigned based on a student’s attendance and class participation (20%), as well as on the successful completion of a term paper (30%), a mid-term (30%), and a presentation (20%). Assignments are due as outlined below; late work will not be accepted without prior arrangement with the Instructors.

Syllabus

430. SEMINAR IN CULTURAL HERITAGE PRESERVATION

(CAC, W45, 1:10-4:10, Art Library Seminar Room, Section: 01, Woodhouse-Beyer, 04991) (Cross listed with 01:506:391:01 and 16:082:530:01)

This seminar addresses crucial issues of conservation and preservation within the rapidly changing world of the 21st century. It is interdisciplinary in focus. Interested students from other majors/fields/disciplines are welcome. Threats to works of art, monuments, and sites have increased exponentially in the last decades. War and ethnic conflict have led to wanton destruction of monuments as diverse as the Bamiyan Buddhas and the Mostar bridge, and to the destruction or dispersal of works of art from museums, monuments, and sites in Egypt, Iraq, Afghanistan, and beyond. The commoditization of art and the booming global art market have led to a global increase in theft and looting of monuments, sites, and religious and secular institutions. Museums, long believed to be sacrosanct, have come under scrutiny regarding policies of restitution regarding works of art confiscated in WW II, and for alleged participation in the illegal art market. This seminar examines these issues within the context of current preservation theory and practice.

Issues to be addressed include: Who Owns the Past?; UNESCO and World Heritage; Cultural Heritage as Commodity; The Legal and Illegal Market in Historic Material; the Ethics of Collecting (museums, collectors, dealers); The Destruction of Cultural Heritage during War or Ethnic Conflict; Looting and willful destruction of Historic Sites and Buildings; International and National approaches to Cultural Heritage Management

Course Goals:

• To define and identify current threats to the conservation of the monuments, sites, works of art and material culture that constitute our cultural heritage worldwide.

• To assess international and national initiatives being taken to protect cultural heritage, both

tangible and intangible.

• To enable you to formulate, discuss, and defend your own values through critical analysis ofthe

material covered and to become an effective advocate for the preservation of cultural heritage.

• To raise awareness of a flourishing field of Cultural Heritage Preservation and career

opportunities within the field

• To encourage you to develop an international perspective that will enrich your future studies.

Course Requirements:

Attendance and Seminar Discussion (10%); Midterm Quiz (15%); 2 Student Report Presentations (30%); 1 Case Study Presentation (15%); Research Paper Presentation (15%); Research Paper (15%)

Attendance and Seminar Discussion/Presentations: Students are expected to attend all classes and to participate in class discussion. Throughout the semester, students will present (ungraded) brief reports on assigned readings and graded student report and case presentation topics to be researched on the Internet.

Readings:

Readings are available on our SAKAI site. They are designed to introduce you to cultural heritage issues.

In addition to the assigned reading, additional material will serve as a valuable resource for research topics. Students are responsible for familiarizing themselves with this material as it relates to their projects. The Internet, current newspapers, and periodicals are valuable resources that should be consulted regularly for research and to keep up to date on cultural property issues in general. There is a list of valuable Internet sites posted with the syllabus.

Midterm Quiz:

A midterm quiz will cover material (readings, presentations) presented in the first half of our course.

Research Paper/Research Paper Presentation:

Students will research and write a research paper of approximately 12-15 pages. Students registered for

082:430 should consult with the instructor to design a topic related both cultural heritage and to their particular focus within the Program in Art History, other major/field, and/or CHAPS.

441. CULTURAL HERITAGE AND DISASTERS: PREPAREDNESS, RESPONSE, AND RESILIENCE

(CAC, W67, 4:30-7:30, VH 001, Section: 01, Woodhouse-Beyer, 06544) (Cross listed with 01:506:391:02 and 16:082:593:01)

COURSE DESCRIPTION

In the past, and throughout the contemporary era, natural and cultural disasters of local, national, and international scale have challenged cultural heritage sites and communities around the world. This seminar course considers a variety of disaster events, such as hurricanes, earthquakes, tsunamis, climate change, warfare/terrorism, and pandemics, and their effects on historic properties, archaeological sites, cultural landscapes, museum collections, communities, and cultures. Our seminar work will take a cultural resource management and historic preservation approach to the discussion of global case studies; strategies and protocols for disaster preparedness and post-disaster response/survey/preservation; post-disaster site and district assessment, restoration, and protection approaches and tools; and critical review and assessment of national and international cultural heritage disaster management plans.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

After taking this course, students enrolled in Cultural Heritage and Disasters: Preparedness, Response, and Resilience will be able to:

1. Understand the destructive effects of natural phenomena and cultural forces on cultural and historic properties, communities, and landscapes;

2. Evaluate the roles of local, state, national, and international agencies and organizations in disaster management planning, response, and mitigation;

3. Acquire a broad knowledge of the methods of damage assessment and disaster management mitigation principles concerning historic properties, archaeological sites, and communities affected by natural disasters;

4. Discuss and critique national and international approaches to disaster management and mitigation through the evaluation of case studies.

5. Consider the social, political, and economic implications of disasters, and disaster preparation and mitigation, on the preservation and restoration of the cultural heritage of local, national, and global communities.

Requirements: Attendance and Seminar Discussion (10%); 2 Case Presentations (30%); Midterm exam (20%); Research Paper (20%), Take home final exam (20%)

442. (GLOBAL)HERITAGE AND THE ROLE OF THE MUSEUM

(CAC, M67, 4:30-7:30, VH 001, Section: 01, Spratt, 11912) (Cross listed with 01:506:391:04 and 16:082:603:01)

This seminar examines the historical development of the museum as a cultural institution and its role in the construction of local and global conceptions of heritage. The course will pay particular attention to the ways in which the museum reflects a perspective of the world that is shaped by the valuation and systematization of our knowledge of it. We will explore the origins of the museum in relation to Renaissance art and nature collections and its epistemological foundations, in the culture of the Enlightenment, to its evolution as an arbiter of cultural patrimony in an increasingly globalized world. The role of museums in the identity politics of the modern nation-­‐state will be critically analyzed in the seminar through a series of case studies that will take us halfway around the globe. Through an investigation of museums from New York, Philadelphia, Salvador, Paris, Venice, Sofia, Corfu, Athens, to Moscow, the course will consider a broad range of themes including post-­‐colonialism, nationalism, heritage and identity formation, memory, nostalgia, authenticity, and the representation of alterity in the museum.

444. ARCHITECTURAL CONSERVATION: A SUSTAINABLE APPROACH

(CAC, W, 9:50-12:30, VH 104, Hewitt, Section: 01, 16382) (Cross listed with 01:506:391:03 and 16:082:594:01)

This course, co-listed for graduate as well as undergraduate students, presents an alternative view of architectural conservation based upon the new schema of sustainability. Since buildings cannot be separated from their ecological and historical context, it makes sense to view their continued life as a part of the biosphere. Lectures will cover the history of architectural conservation during the first half of the course, and explore new concepts in preservation during the second half. Requirements include two exams and a research paper.

447. INTERNSHIP IN HISTORIC PRESERVATION

(Hours by arrangement, by permission of the CHAPS director, See department staff for special permission number, Index 04992)

491. CAPSTONE IN ART HISTORY: FROM THE STUDIO TO THE SELFIE: PORTRAITURE FOR THE 21ST CENTURY

(CAC, W34, 11:30-2:30, VH 001, Sidlauskas, Section: 01, 06791)

These days it seems as if we are all either making or looking at some form of portrait. We can take photos of ourselves and post them almost instantly to our followers, with an unprecedented control over how and when our images are dispersed. On the other hand, we are also being observed and recorded daily by diverse methods of surveillance, including facial recognition software programmed to identify us by our conformity to a replica that we never see.

The age of the selfie and surveillance demands new tools for producing and understanding the portrait. In what ways are likeness and resemblance still relevant—if in fact they are? Must the person portrayed have actually lived? Can a representation of a fictive persona be a portrait? How are gender, class, age, and sexuality all manipulated in portraiture? Contemporary systems of establishing identity--DNA, fingerprints, medical X-rays, genome-mapping, for example—have influenced our understanding of how identity is both measured and represented. We will also consider the various ways that one can construct a portrait without relying on the face—or even the human figure.

It has been said that this is the “Stone Age” of the selfie—that it will take generations to pick and choose which images will merit a second look. While not every selfie is an art object, a “successful” one seems to depend upon assumptions about identity and resemblance that have their roots in traditional forms of portraiture.

We will focus on work in all media dating from the early 19th century to the present: major portrait painters—Sargent, Degas, Manet, Eakins, for example—whose paintings often subverted the identity as well as the economic and psychological stability of their subjects. Contemporary artists will include painters Kehinde Wiley and Elizabeth Peyton, photographers Gary Schneider and Maria Magdalena Campos-Pons; the installations of Sue Williamson and Christian Boltanski; and the documented performances of Nikki Lee.

Students will be encouraged to work on research projects in their own special field of interest (i.e. classical, Renaissance, photography/video, contemporary, etc.). Each student will do a short presentation (more like leading a discussion) of a reading in class, and submit a 2 page review of the text; a longer presentation (15-20 minutes) on a research subject of the student’s choice—developed in consultation with the professor, and finally, a research paper of 10-12 pages.

Syllabus

491. CAPSTONE IN ART HISTORY: ITALIAN RENAISSANCE PORTRAITURE

(CAC, T, 9:50-12:50, VH 001, McHam, Section: 02, 19176)

Between 1300 and 1500, an almost unprecedented type of art in recent times—the representation of likenesses of persons who had lived on earth—emerged and flourished in Italian Renaissance painting and sculpture.

This seminar will take up problems such as:the relations to Roman portraiture, the differences between rulerportraits and those of ordinary individuals, the distinctions between male

and female portraiture, the rare likenesses of children, the inclusion of portraits in the guise of saints, the connections of portraits of Christ and the Virgin to those of secular individuals, and whether portraits painted by women look different than those painted by men.

Student teams will lead the seminar in weekly readings. Individual students will prepare research reports on an object of their choice to deliver to the seminar (20 minutes), and then write them up as research papers of between 15-20 pages.

Syllabus

493. INDIVIDUAL STUDY IN ART HISTORY

(Special permission required, Index 00017)

495. INTERNSHIP IN ART HISTORY

(Special permission required, Index 04993)

497. HONORS IN ART HISTORY

(CAC, F, 11:30-2:30, VH001, Section: 01, STAFF, Index 00018)

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