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Undergraduate courses Fall 2018

FALL 2018 COURSE CALENDAR

105. INTRODUCTION TO ART HISTORY

(LIV, TF3, 12:00-1:20, BE201, Section: 05, TBD, Index 19164)

This course can be used to fulfill the HST and AHp areas of the Core - http://sasundergrad.rutgers.edu/academics/requirements/core

This course presents an introductory overview of the history of Western art from antiquity to the late medieval period. It considers the achievements of great civilizations ranging from Egypt to the Holy Roman Empire, and focuses on a diversity of cultural and religious traditions, including, Byzantine, Islamic, and Jewish. The class examines a wide array of objects, including statues of gods and emperors, reliquaries containing saints’ bones, Greek temples and Gothic cathedrals, early synagogue decoration, devotional manuscripts, and gold-gilded altarpieces.

Emphasizing significant stylistic movements in Western Europe, this course lays the groundwork for more advanced art history courses by introducing visual analysis and other interpretative tools of art historical research. Students will also learn how the visual products of a culture relate to historical circumstances, societal values, and shifting personal and collective identities. The skills developed in this class provide important tools for navigating and interpreting media and visual representation in the twenty-first century.

  1. INTRODUCTION TO ART HISTORY

(C/D, MH2, 10:55 AM-12:15 PM, ARH-200, Section 05, Puglisi, Index 00012)

This course can be used to fulfill the HST and AHp areas of the Core - http://sasundergrad.rutgers.edu/academics/requirements/core

This course presents an introductory overview of the history of Western art from antiquity to the late medieval period. It considers the achievements of great civilizations ranging from Egypt to the Holy Roman Empire, and focuses on a diversity of cultural and religious traditions, including, Byzantine, Islamic, and Jewish. The class examines a wide array of objects, including statues of gods and emperors, reliquaries containing saints’ bones, Greek temples and Gothic cathedrals, early synagogue decoration, devotional manuscripts, and gold-gilded altarpieces.

Emphasizing significant stylistic movements in Western Europe, this course lays the groundwork for more advanced art history courses by introducing visual analysis and other interpretative tools of art historical research. Students will also learn how the visual products of a culture relate to historical circumstances, societal values, and shifting personal and collective identities. The skills developed in this class provide important tools for navigating and interpreting media and visual representation in the twenty-first century.

105. INTRODUCTION TO ART HISTORY

(CAC, TH8, 7:40-9:00pm, VH105, Section: 07, Paulsen, Index 04215)

This course can be used to fulfill the HST and AHp areas of the Core - http://sasundergrad.rutgers.edu/academics/requirements/core

This course presents an introductory overview of the history of Western art from antiquity to the late medieval period. It considers the achievements of great civilizations ranging from Egypt to the Holy Roman Empire, and focuses on a diversity of cultural and religious traditions, including, Byzantine, Islamic, and Jewish. The class examines a wide array of objects, including statues of gods and emperors, reliquaries containing saints’ bones, Greek temples and Gothic cathedrals, early synagogue decoration, devotional manuscripts, and gold-gilded altarpieces.

Emphasizing significant stylistic movements in Western Europe, this course lays the groundwork for more advanced art history courses by introducing visual analysis and other interpretative tools of art historical research. Students will also learn how the visual products of a culture relate to historical circumstances, societal values, and shifting personal and collective identities. The skills developed in this class provide important tools for navigating and interpreting media and visual representation in the twenty-first century.

106. INTRODUCTION TO ART HISTORY

(CAC, MW8, 7:40-9:00pm, VH105, Section: 01, Delossantos, Index 19165)

This course can be used to fulfill the HST and AHp areas of the Core - http://sasundergrad.rutgers.edu/academics/requirements/core

This course presents an introductory overview of the history of Western art from antiquity to the late medieval period. It considers the achievements of great civilizations ranging from Egypt to the Holy Roman Empire, and focuses on a diversity of cultural and religious traditions, including, Byzantine, Islamic, and Jewish. The class examines a wide array of objects, including statues of gods and emperors, reliquaries containing saints’ bones, Greek temples and Gothic cathedrals, early synagogue decoration, devotional manuscripts, and gold-gilded altarpieces.

Emphasizing significant stylistic movements in Western Europe, this course lays the groundwork for more advanced art history courses by introducing visual analysis and other interpretative tools of art historical research. Students will also learn how the visual products of a culture relate to historical circumstances, societal values, and shifting personal and collective identities. The skills developed in this class provide important tools for navigating and interpreting media and visual representation in the twenty-first century.

 

205. INTRODUCTION TO ASIAN ART

(CAC, MW4, 1:00-2:30, ZAM-MPR, Section 01, Sears, Index 19167)

Moving chronologically and thematically, this course surveys the history of art across Asia, with particular emphasis on India, China, and Japan, and with limited forays into Korea, Cambodia, and Indonesia.  Each week’s lectures highlight key moments in Asia’s visual history, beginning with the earliest civilizations of the bronze age and moving through to the politics of globalizing art worlds in the present day.  A strong emphasis will be placed on parallel developments, on important cultural connections, and on moments of cultural contact through pilgrimage, travel, and trade. Topics to be considered include urbanism, architecture and the built environment, sculpture in various media, decorative arts, ceramics, illustrated manuscripts, scrolls and painting; portraiture; theology and ritual arts; colonialism and globalization; and contemporary arts and artistic revivals.This course is intended as an introductory survey, accessible to both majors and non-majors, and no background in either art history or Asian studies is necessary for its successful completion. Syllabus

214. RENAISSANCE ART IN EUROPE

(CAC, TH3, 11:30-12:50, ZAM-MPR, Section 01, McHam, Index 19188)

In our era many European countries have united to form a single state in terms of their monetary systems and many of their regulations. That alliance is showing signs of fraying, because in part they are running counter to more than 1500 years of independence and cultural and linguistic differences. Nowhere is that diversity more apparent than during the Renaissance, defined for our purposes here as the fourteenth through sixteenth centuries, which represents a universally recognized high point in artistic achievement all over Europe. This class will examine a series of masterpieces from the European tradition that reveal artistic forms that were intrinsic to culture north and south of the Alps, with the goal of pointing out their different features as well as their commonalities. It will consider these features against the backdrop of the first wide European exposure to cultures outside its boundaries. Most of the objects we’ll study were not considered works of art in their day, but instead visual aids to religious practice, a means of commemorating an individual, or objects to decorate or to promote pleasure. The broader objective is to create a background that leads to a better understanding of the European contribution in the epoch of the development of early modern culture. Syllabus

250. OCEANIC, AFRICAN AND PRECOLONIAL ART

(CAC, TTH4, 1:10-2:30, VH104, Section: 01, Brett-Smith, Index 16674)

This course explores the explosive ideas found in Non-western art. How can one explain head hunting and cannibalism among the Asmat? Why do the Kongo people think of time as a recurring spiral? Why did the peoples of Meso-America place so much emphasis on creating architectural features below ground rather than above ground? Why is art so often created only to be left for destruction by the natural environment? Why do members of Non-western societies distort their appearance through extreme body art? The course will describe the concepts that underlie belief in the necessity of cannibalism, the recurrence of events in time, the power of the natural landscape to mold those who live in it, and the value of body art. Classroom time will not only focus on lectures, but on discussions of assigned articles. Syllabus

306. ROMAN ART

(CAC, TH5, 2:50-4:10, ZAM-MPR, Section 01, Kenfield, Index 19189)

308. ITALY, 1250-1400: THE HINGE BETWEEN MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE ART

(CAC, TH4, 1:10-2:30, ZAM-MPR,Section 1, McHam, Index 19171)

This is a survey of Italian art and architecture from the mid-13th century until 1400, focusing on the painting of Giotto and Duccio and their legacies. This was a time of great change as art began to move away from medieval ideals and set the stage for the beginnings of the renaissance. The course will investigate the development of a humanized, expressive interpretation in religious art, and the ways in which art and architecture served to construct civic identity and pride in the peninsula’s independent city-states, as well as to meet the objectives of its patrons, whether male or female, secular or religious.  There will be a class held at the Metropolitan Museum, a mid-term and a final exam, as well as a short research paper.

 syllabus

383. TWENTIETH-CENTURY PHOTOGRAPHY

(CAC, MW4, 1:10-2:40, ZAM-EDR, Section 01, Zervigon, Index 19170)

 This course addresses a number of key themes in the history of twentieth-century photography. Photography’s attraction as an object of study is that there remains no aspect of modern life—from birth to death, from sex to war, from atoms to planets, from commerce to art—that is not touched by the medium in one way or another. Photography is an image and a practice that thoroughly infiltrates and mediates the phenomenal world around us. This omnipresence and omnipotence poses a unique problem for the study of photography’s history: how do you develop a coherent and effective method of analysis for an entity that is so ubiquitous and various? How can you speak with equal sensitivity about the photograph as a thing, and about what any particular photograph is of? How can you identify the meaning of a photograph when that meaning is so heavily determined by its context, a situation that is always shifting and is therefore itself hard to define?

This course will address these questions through a close study of the history of photography in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, as that history developed within a number of specific conditions, from the advent of the First World War through to the present. The course is a selective investigation, not a comprehensive or strictly chronological survey. Taken as a whole, the we will look at photography as a cultural phenomenon as much as an art form, critically studying the various discursive arenas which this medium has helped to foster and redefine over the past century. To this end, you will be actively engaged in looking closely at photographs and reading debates related to them. Syllabus

387. ROCCOCO TO REALISM

(CAC, W23,9:50-12:50, ZAM-MPR, Section 01, Taube, Index 19169)

This course will focus on visual arts created in England and Europe from the 1730s through the 1860s, a period known for its artistic and political revolutions and for its conflictual relationship with tradition. It will explore broad artistic movements and styles, such as Rococo, Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Orientalism, and Realism. The works discussed will include celebrated paintings such as David’s Oath of the Horatii, Goya’s TheThird of May, Delacroix’s Liberty Leading the People, Turner’s The Slave Ship, and Courbet’s The Stonebreakers as well as Canova’s sculpture, Daumier’s printmaking, and Daguerre’s early photography. Among the topics to be addressed are the shift from history paintings to everyday life scenes; the politics of the body from the fall of the revolutionary hero to the rise of the ordinary citizen; landscape and its embodiment of personal and national identity; the impact of science and technology on the making and interpretation of art; and the representation of race as informed by racial theories and anxieties. Rather than an exhaustive survey, this class will consider a relatively small number of key works by each artist. The lectures will be supplemented by critical readings by artists, critics, and art historians that approach the course material from diverse perspectives.

430. CULTURAL HERITAGE PRESERVATION

(CAC, MW5, 2:50-4:10, ZAM-EDR, Section 01, Rico, Index 4450)

441. SIGNIFICANCE OF OBJECTS: MATERIAL CULTURAL STUDIES AND CULTURAL HERITAGE

Al Kuntar

Course Description

Political upheaval in the Middle East has brought cultural heritage studies to the forefront. From playing a role in the making of national identity and economy of Middle Eastern countries to falling prey to armed conflicts, cultural heritage remains an important element of the political and social scene. This seminar will examine the relatedness of cultural heritage to questions of identity and politics in the Middle East, and the impact of recent wars on such heritage.

The seminar will start by outlining the cultural heritage of the Middle East, and its connection to recent and contemporary politics in several Middle Eastern countries. It will then proceed to discuss the following major topics:

- Cultural diversity of modern Middle Eastern societies, the perception of cultural heritage in these societies, and the survival of long-living historical places, old traditions and material culture of all kinds.

- The influence of ancient cultures on common fixation and beliefs of modern identity in Middle Eastern societies (e.g. particular ethnic and religious groups see themselves as direct descendants of one or a number of ancient groups such as Phoenicians, Israelites, Assyrians)..

-The use of archeological and historical data to create narratives of the past that promote specific political ideologies in the modern Middle East and, in some cases, to fabricate novel cultural and political realities.

-The damage to cultural heritage caused by recent wars in Iraq and Syria, and (i) how these wars are/were the makers of a new time that disrupted the living past through the destruction of cultural landscapes; and (ii) the involvement of cultural heritage institutions and archaeologists in rescuing cultural heritage in the event of war.

442. THE POLITICS OF HERITAGE

(CAC, W23, 9:50-12:50, VH-001, Section 01, Gomes Coelho, Index 07379

Your home, the pyramids of Giza, grandmother’s Pierogi recipe, the 9/11 memorials, your favorite National Park, and artworks looted by Nazis. What do all these things have in common? They are all cultural heritage, and they are all the consequence of a political context. Cultural heritage is an entanglement of discourses and experiences that mediate the past in the present, and give meaning to our existence as socialized beings. Heritage is both material and immaterial, and is prompted by a wide range of multi-temporal devices: objects and memories, buildings and landscapes, peoples’ traditions, and our own bodies. Notions of heritage became central in the construction of the Western world, particularly in the articulation of modern nation-states since the 19th century. Heritage— whether materialized in archaeological artifacts and urbanism, or expressed in foodways, performative arts or any other cultural form—was assumed as the language that expressed peoples’ identities, and entitled nation-states to social and political borders. Because of its associations with power, modernity and the West, heritage has been always an arena for social struggles. Defining heritage is a contested process that brings into confront different conceptions of identity and community, as well as different positionalities regarding economics, development, environmental sustainability, authenticity, ethics, and law. Over this course, we will discuss the history of heritage as a concept, and investigate the ways heritage is constructed, negotiated, and perceived in the contemporary world. We will critically examine cultural heritage, and how its professionals—e.g. anthropologists, archaeologists, art historians, museum professionals, architects—and stakeholders engage in the process of defining heritage. We will examine key issues in the work heritage such as the notions of authenticity, ownership, risk, protection, and responsibility. The course will also provide a critical overview of the theories and methodologies available to heritage professionals, and we will discuss major case-studies pertaining each week’s theme.

491. CAPSTONE SEMINAR:THE ARCHITECTURE OF COLLEGES IN THE US

(CAC, T23, 9:50-12:50, ZAM-EDR, Section 01, Yanni, Index 06004

Why do American college students live on campus? Why do college professors conduct research? Why are some colleges private and others public? Why do colleges often have green lawns and open spaces? What do Americans hope to get out of college? Will distance learning cause the demise of the physical college campus?

This seminar will examine the history of American higher education by studying its architecture. We will look at American universities from the colonial period to the present. The course will be taught from a social historical perspective, taking into account changing educational theories and the relationship of those theories to architectural design and planning history. American colleges will be compared to British precedents and contrasted with relevant building types such as hospitals, lunatic asylums, and prisons. Turning points in the history of American higher education will guide the topics of each seminar: the establishment of colonial colleges, the Morrill Act and the rise of land grant universities, the G.I. Bill and the expansion of state universities after World War II, counterculture student movements in the late 1960s and 70s. Students will learn about architectural research techniques, visit university buildings, and read historic documents. The course will be conducted as a seminar, and students are expected to keep up with readings and participate in class discussion. The weight of the final grade will rest on a presentation and paper, but quizzes and in-class writing assignments may also be included. Syllabus

563. CURATORIAL TRAINING

(CAC,M67, 4:30-7:30, VH-001, Section 01, Sharp, Index 02436)

This introductory course is designed to expose students to the range of practical and theoretical concerns that define the curatorial profession. Based at the Zimmerli Art Museum, and drawing on the professional expertise of its curators and staff from registrars to preparation and installation crew, we will address topics from connoisseurship and object based research to housing and installation. Other subjects examined during the course include acquisitions, cataloguing, and collection care as well as exhibition planning and budgeting. Some sessions will be held at other local museums and collections (in the NYC/Philadelphia area). Museum trips, most of which will take place on Thursday mornings (or evenings in the rare case), are mandatory and I will make every effort to schedule these to suit everyone’s needs. Syllabus

 

530. CULTURAL HERITAGE AND PRESERVATION STUDIES

(CAC, MW5, 2:50-4:10, ZAM-EDR, Setion 01, Rico, Index 07019)

 593. STUDIES IN CULTURAL HERITAGE AND PRESERVATION STUDIES

(CAC, M67, 4:30-7:30, AB-6190, Section 01, Al Kuntar, Index 11756)

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