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2009 Michelle Moskal Featured Intern

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Michelle Moskal , an Art History major, was featured in the Intern Profile section of Preservation New Jersey Quarterly Newsletter. Preservation New Jersey (PNJ) is the premier organization for historic preservation in our state. Michelle was an Intern at Preservation New Jersey, from December 2008 to May 2009, doing research and going on site visits as part of the ten most endangered sites committee (see: http://pnj10most.org/).
“Working with PNJ,” says the Profile, “gave her a much better insight into this process than any textbook ever could …. PNJ would like to acknowledge Michelle for her commitment to help communities in the state of New Jersey preserve their historic sites.”
Ms. Moskal is a senior Art History major and a cultural anthropology minor who is considering graduate study in Classical archaeology or Egyptology. Her interest in preservation began in the Historic Preservation overview with Dr. Tod Marder which touched briefly on topics of local development and the historic integrity of towns. Ron Emerich, the executive director of PNJ spoke to one the preservation classes about how towns are losing their historic buildings that are being replaced with very large houses. The only thing organizations can do is raise awareness. Inspired by this Michelle decided to contact the director to talk about possibilities.
The duties of the internship included the researching historic aspects of a building, the significance of the architecture, the historical importance of the building or prior owners to county, state or United States, the current status and the danger to the building. As an intern, Michelle could do much of the research from her desk in the dorm rather than travel to the Trenton. The work also included site visits. Michelle notes she learned that “a little bit of information can spur quite a bit of support” and that Preservation New jersey could use more student interns
As a student in the Certificate Program in Historic Preservation, which is open to undergraduates and graduate students, Michelle has demonstrated how theory and local realities work together. Although there are a large number of interns working on international projects, her commitment symbolizes the goal of both the Certificate Program and the entire University: Local Roots, Global Reach.

2009 Undergraduate Honors

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back row: Dr. Thuno, Dr. Yanni, Sarah Filik, Runxiiao Zhu, Dr. Puglisi, Dr. Zervignon, Kim Sels and Olivia Gruber.
Front row: Sakinia, Namazi, Veronica Man, Tae Richmond and Kimberly Roode

On Thursday, April 30, 2009 six honors students gave presentations in the Zimmerli Multipurpose Room to faculty, parents and friends. The papers were written under the supervision of faculty advisors and Kim Sels and Olivia Gruber. The honors papers are as follows:
Sarah K. Filik, "Androgynizing a Classic: Girodet’s Sleep of Endymion"
Veronica Man, "Pierre Legros’ Allegorical Sculpture Religion Overthrowing
Heresy in Performance at the Gesù"
Sakina Namazi, "Center for Protests: The Social and Architectural
Developments of the Student Union in 1960s America"
Tae Richmond, "Understanding Wall’s Women"
Kimberley Roode, "Nikki S. Lee’s Parts: Narratives of Nostalgia and the
Photographic Memory"
Runxiao Zhu, "Tangut Imprint During the Yuan Dynasty at the Cave Temple of
Feilaifeng"

2009 Keyjo Lee is Commencement Speaker

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Key Jo Lee of Willingboro, New Jersey, and the 2009 class of Douglass College, has been selected for this honor of being the student speaker at the university commencement on May 20, 2009. An art history major, Lee is a Douglass Scholar and a Ronald E. McNair Scholar, and was inducted into Phi Beta Kappa in her junior year.
Lee will be attending Yale University in a joint doctoral program in African-American studies and art history. She plans to study contemporary African-American art and the art of the African Diaspora, and hopes to become a professor of art history.
Most recently Key Jo was among a group of Art History students representing the department at a joint student symnposium in Princeton on April 24. Lee's paper was entitled "Jokes on Us versus Jokes by Us: The Humor of Manipulated Images in the Work of Ellen Gallagher and Kara Walker "
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Student Speaker
Key Jo Lee

Douglass College
Each year, a committee of faculty and staff members chooses an outstanding graduating senior to deliver the undergraduate commencement address from among nominees put forward by the deans of Rutgers’ undergraduate colleges and schools. This year, Key Jo Lee of Willingboro, New Jersey, has been selected for this honor. An art history major, Lee is a Douglass Scholar and a Ronald E. McNair Scholar, and was inducted into Phi Beta Kappa in her junior year.
Lee is a nontraditional-aged student, having enrolled at Rutgers as a first-year student after being out of school for several years. She found a welcoming home at Douglass where the Mary I. Bunting Program is especially designed to ease the transition to college for older students. As a sophomore, Lee assumed a leadership role among her peers, becoming president of the Sophia Organization for nontraditional-aged students and serving as a Bunting peer adviser and representative to the Douglass Governing Association. Throughout her junior and senior years, she continued as a mentor to older students and as resident assistant for the Sophia House, a residence for nontraditional-aged women students.
Lee’s dedication to academic excellence has been equal to her commitment to her peers and the campus community. She has excelled from the outset, making the Dean’s List every semester and maintaining between a 3.8 and 4.0 grade-point average. As early as the summer before her sophomore year, she undertook serious scholarly research, traveling to Urbino, Italy, on a grant from the Douglass Associate Alumnae. The following year, Lee was accepted into the Ronald E. McNair Postbaccalaureate Achievement Program, a national effort to encourage minority and low-income, first-generation college students to aim for graduate school. As a result of the program, Lee had the opportunity to present her research findings at conferences in Maryland and Illinois.
Lee has been accepted at Yale University in a joint doctoral program in African-American studies and art history. She plans to study contemporary African-American art and the art of the African Diaspora, and hopes to become a professor of art history.

2009 Florence Quideau Wins Distinguished Teaching Award

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Congratulations to our graduate student, Florence Quideau, recipent of the SAS Distinguished Contribution to Undergraduate Teaching Award!

2009 Sydney Leon Jacobs Lecture in American Art

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Martin Berger, Tanya Sheehan, Joan Marter, Barbara Mitnik and Matthew Baigell
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Dr. Berger Answering Questions
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Before the Lecture
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Joan Marter, Matthew Baigell and Barbara Mitnik
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Tanya Sheehan, Martin Berger and Matthew Baigell
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