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Program Information

PhD. Concentration in Cultural Heritage and Preservation Studies

Chaps PhD

This 12 credit concentration within the Department of Art History Ph.D. program provides participants with the opportunity to broaden and give depth to their art historical/archaeological areas of specialization through the exploration of cross-disciplinary and global approaches to the analysis of monuments, sites and works of art within the context of World Heritage.

The CHAPS concentration is an appropriate complement for all of the fields of specialization currently offered in the Department of Art History. Students are encouraged to think broadly and cross-culturally, and to integrate relevant theory and practice into their art historical research, writing, and teaching. The concentration provides participants with additional areas of competence that will enhance career opportunities both outside and within academia. Cultural Heritage Preservation is a fast growing trans-disciplinary academic field at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. Potential employers outside of academia include: museums-ranging from encyclopedic to highly specialized; cultural institutions and sites; governmental and non-governmental agencies dealing with tangible and intangible cultural heritage (the World Monuments Fund, UNESCO, ICOMOS, for example); auction houses; local, regional and national preservation offices; historic preservation commissions and societies; preservation advocacy organizations; cultural resource management firms; architectural and landscape architecture firms; and design or planning firms (national and international in focus). Cultural Heritage Preservation is a fast growing trans-disciplinary academic field as well.

CHAPS concentration: Curriculum

Four courses (12 credits)

Normally graduates participating in the program will take the Seminar in Global Heritage Preservation in addition to two seminars on key issues in Cultural Heritage. A fourth course may be an additional seminar on a key theme, or an internship approved by the CHAPS advisor.

Dissertation Proposal

Students choosing the CHAPS concentration will be encouraged to develop a dissertation topic with a strong cultural heritage component in consultation with their CHAPS and Art History advisor. A CHAPS faculty member will serve on the Dissertation committee.

Qualifying Exam

The qualifying exam consists of an oral exam followed by the ten day written paper. Both the written and oral exams will contain a CHAPS concentration component. A CHAPS faculty member will serve on the examination committee.

The oral examination is approximately two hours in length. After successful completion of this portion, the student undertakes the written portion. The topic of the paper, which is assigned by the committee, is designed to assist students with formulating concepts and methods for their dissertations.

Admission

Students accepted into to the Graduate Ph.D. Program in Art History through the existing admission process have the option of choosing to pursue this concentration.

Ph.D. Coursework requirements with CHAPS concentration.

36 credits of coursework, of which 12 credits must be related to the CHAPS program. 6 credits - dissertation proposal

6 credits - qualifying exam

24 credits - research

72 TOTAL

Changes to the Program, Fall 2012

Changes to the Graduate Program requirements, which go into effect with the entering class of 2012.  Additional details will be appearing soon on our website.  Note: Students who entered the program earlier have the option of choosing the new formats, described below.

The Master’s in Art History

Students who need to strengthen their backgrounds in certain areas of the field are encouraged to take undergraduate 300-level courses, registered as a graduate student.

The M.A. exam

The M.A. examination is scheduled twice a year, once in August, and once in March (dates to be announced).  The exam itself will consist of a series of essay questions, chosen from a list of six which the student is given one week before the exam.  The questions are chosen and graded by an M.A. faculty committee. The purpose of this exam is to test students’ abilities to write cogently about works of art and architecture across a variety of fields in a way that incorporates their history, context, and form.

Ph.D. students petition to waive the M.A. exam, when they apply for candidacy to the Ph.D. track of the program, which should be done by January of the second year.

The M.A. essay, for both Master’s and Ph.D. students

 (Note: doctoral students may not schedule either their dissertation proposal presentation or their qualifying exams until the Master’s essay is complete.)

A Master’s Essay is submitted to one faculty advisor and a second reader.  Most successful essays—which should be approximately 25 to 35 pages—are based on a prior seminar paper, which the student, aided by the advice of the appropriate faculty member, refines and expands.  The essay should be completed by the end of the summer after courses are finished.

The Ph.D. Track in Art History

 A minor field:

PhD candidates are strongly encouraged to complete a Minor Field. A student’s major and minor fields should be reasonably distinct from one another, separated by some combination of media, geography, time period or other factors as appropriate.  Definition of the major and minor fields, although proposed by the student, must have the approval of the primary faculty advisor and the Graduate Program Director. Successful passing of the minor field option consists of two classes in the minor field and a written qualifying paper which can be an extension of a seminar paper written for class. Students will be allowed to count one advanced undergraduate course (taken for graduate credit) toward the minor field. The minor-qualifying paper may be the same as the student’s M.A. essay.  If the student submits the M.A. paper as the Minor Option qualifying paper, the rules regarding M.A. papers must be followed.  At the same time the paper is approved for the M.A, the advisor will also approve the paper for the minor field.

There is no minor field option for students pursuing the M.A. degree as their final degree. 

Doctoral students should submit the qualifying paper to the Graduate Program Director and one other art history faculty member for approval (usually the professor who taught the course for which the paper was written). If the paper was written in another department or at another institution, the student must nonetheless submit it to the Graduate Program Director and one Rutgers art history faculty member for review.

Dissertation Proposal and Qualifying Examinations

PhD. Students must complete the Master’s Essay before registering for either their exam preparation or dissertation proposal preparation.  NO EXCEPTIONS.

Students without a dissertation topic in their fourth year, or third, if they have been admitted with an M.A., cannot register for dissertation research or their exams, but must register as “Matriculation continued.”

Students, with their faculty advisors and members of their exam committee should plan the date at least six months in advance, in order to ensure that all relevant faculty members are present.  If a faculty advisor anticipates being away during the semester the student plans to take the exam, he or she will be responsible for finding a substitute, or choosing to come into Rutgers on the day of the exam.  All members of the exam committee must be present—unless there is a personal emergency. 

The Dissertation Proposal

  • The dissertation proposal will be presented in a closed-door meeting to the dissertation committee no later than twelve weeks after successful completion of the comprehensive exam, or in the first weeks of the Fall semester in the case of a summer break. Students will circulate the proposal in advance of the meeting, and the meeting will be an in-depth discussion of the written proposal with no oral presentation component.
  • The committee must consist of three members of the department and may also include the outside reader, at the adviser’s discretion. Upon consultation with the adviser, the student may wish to invite other faculty members from within or outside the Department to participate in the meeting. Approval of the dissertation proposal shall be decided by the committee.
  • Recognizing the value of general departmental involvement by both faculty and students in the dissertation process, the department will schedule a “work in progress workshop” once a semester to give students the opportunity to present and receive feedback on their ongoing dissertation research.
  • The transition period to the new procedure will be the spring 2016 semester, during which proposing students can choose either the new procedure or the dissertation proposal workshop venue of the past. Thereafter, the new procedure will apply to all.

The Qualifying Exams:

Starting with the incoming graduate class of 2012, all PhD students will take the oral exam followed by the ten day written paper.

Note: There is no change for students currently enrolled, who will continue to have a choice between the ten day format and the two day format. 

 The oral examination will be approximately two hours in length. After successful completion of this portion, the student begins the written portion, usually beginning on the Friday after the oral examination is completed.  The topic of the paper, which is assigned by the committee, is designed to assist students with formulating concepts and methods for their dissertations. 

The goal of the faculty in making this change is to compel students to consider potential dissertation topics earlier in their graduate educations.

A student who fails a portion of the qualifying exams may take one or both portions again within a year.

The Dissertation Defense:

The dissertation defense should take place on campus. While the outside reader may be present electronically, or, if necessary, have supplied a letter to the student’s advisor, the remaining three faculty members, and the student, must be present.  If a faculty member anticipates being on leave at the time of the defense, he or she should either re-schedule the defense, or arrange for a substitute at the time the defense is scheduled. 

Dissertation defenses will begin with a public presentation open to faculty, students, friends and family. The student will present his or her work for 20-25 minutes, followed by questions and discussion with the audience.  For the second portion, the student will meet with his or her committee for a private discussion.  Students may be asked to make revisions, and a date for completion will be discussed.  It is the student’s responsibility to make sure all relevant materials from the graduate school have been filed properly in order to graduate.

Frick Museum/Institute of Fine Arts and Philadelphia Museum of Art Symposia:

 All advanced Ph.D. students may submit an abstract of 500 words to the faculty by November 15 in order to be considered as a speaker at one of these prestigious symposia. The faculty will vote to select the speakers, giving preference to the students who are close to completing their dissertations.

For assistance with preparing for job interviews, talk, and letters of application, students can consult with the faculty on the Job Placement Committee. The committee members will rotate yearly.

PhD Learning Goals and Assessment

                                    The Graduate Program in Art History

                                    PhD Learning Goals and Assessment

                                                Adopted September 2011

 

The Graduate Program in Art History at Rutgers trains PhD students at the highest level in all aspects of the history and theory of the world’s art, architecture and visual culture.  In addition, we provide PhD students with the opportunity to earn professional certificates in Curatorial Studies and in Cultural Heritage and Preservation Studies (CHAPS).  Our students are prepared to assume a range of top positions within the academy, a wide variety of museums in all cultural fields, and also within the growing field of Cultural Heritage, which may encompass positions with federal or state government agencies concerned with preservation and public policy.   

Learning Goal One for Students:

*Attain mastery of the ability to do rigorous research, construct original arguments, and substantiate them in a persuasive, fluent manner.  Identify topics that will make a significant contribution to the field, shaping future discussions and wherever possible, fortifying connections to related endeavors in the humanities and social sciences. 

*Assessment of student achievement in Goal 1.

*Evaluate graduate course grades and assess narrative evaluations by faculty.

* Evaluate students’ completion of requirements: a methods course, coursework in at least three different fields, four courses with term papers

*Organize faculty reviews of student progress, based on close advising and mentoring, from both individual advisors and the graduate director.

*Conduct a two-part PhD exam to assess the depth and breadth of students’ knowledge: an oral exam with a committee of four faculty members, and, if the exam is successful, a ten day research paper, evaluated by the same committee.

 *Role of the Program in helping students to achieve Goal One

*Provide close advising to assure that students are being prepared in a coherent and academically rigorous fashion.

*Engage in effective, regular monitoring of student progress, providing annual reports of student’s progress—from both the student and the committee members

*Organize a regular review by faculty of the graduate curriculum—its coherence and logic; periodically evaluate the requirements of exams, proposal presentations, and dissertation defenses.

*Work with students to develop the bibliographies for their exams and the outlines for their dissertation proposals

*Advise students about relevant graduate seminars offered by the schools in the consortium: Columbia, NYU downtown, the Institute of Fine Arts, the Graduate Center at CUNY, UPenn, and Stonybrook.

*Learning Goal 2 for Students: Engage in and Conduct Original Research

*Assessment of Graduate Student Achievement of Goal Two:

*The presentation and defense of the student’s dissertation proposal at an open workshop, attended by both graduate students and faculty. 

*The submission of an expanded proposal, including bibliography, to the faculty, which votes on the proposal at the next faculty meeting.  

*The Assessment of the quality of the PhD dissertation: When the PhD dissertation is completed and vetted by the advisor and the entire committee, the student presents his/her research at a public defense, followed by a private discussion with the dissertation committee, which may request revisions.  Committees are composed of three Art History faculty and one outside reader, often an Art Historian from a peer institution who is a specialist in the student’s field, and/or a scholar in a related field—History, Classics, Area Studies, for example—who can supply specialized knowledge and support.

* Submission of conference papers and peer-reviewed articles based on the dissertation

Role of the Graduate program in helping students achieve Goal Two.

*Provide early introduction to research methods and opportunities for developing original topics, both in consultation with potential committee members, and through a Methods course taught for new students every year.

*Provide opportunities to present research and receive feedback: conduct rehearsals of projected talks and conference papers, and advise on submission of manuscripts to journals, including the Rutgers Art Review.  

*Support students in identifying potential funding sources, both within and outside Rutgers. 

*Provide comprehensive advising and assist in the identification of mentors.

*Learning Goal Three for Students:  Prepare PhD students to be professionals at the highest levels of academia, museum administration and curating, as well as leaders in the field of preservation studies and cultural heritage.

 *Assessment of graduate student achievement of Goal 3:

*Mentor students in securing internships at institutions that will help train them for the work ahead.

*Review papers presented, publications submitted and advise on professional networking opportunities.

*Evaluate the teaching effectiveness of graduate student instructors with regular observation, and a follow-up discussion, with faculty mentors.

*Keep a current Alumni Data Base.  

Ideal Course of Study

An Ideal course of study:

For Ph.d students entering without an M.A.

Before entering:

During the summer before entering the program, student should complete study of at least one language.  The second can be studied upon entrance into the program. (Renaissance/Baroque students often take German as a 4th course).

The First Year:

Every student is required to take a Methods course in the first year. Students are required to take all their courses at Rutgers, rather than the consortium, unless there are extenuating circumstances, in which case approval is required by the Graduate Program Director, as well as the faculty member at the consortium institution.  By the end of the first year, students should begin to think about their dissertation topics, and do exploratory research during the summer.  If the student is interested in either a curatorial studies or CHAPS certificate, he or she should plan summer internships.

The Second Year:

In the second year, students are encouraged to take at least one course at a consortium school.  They should consider choosing a minor field, and hone in on the subject of their Master’s essay, which must be complete before they can register for dissertation research or exam preparation in September of the third year.  By the end of the second year, students should have a grasp of their potential dissertation topics, spending a good portion of the summer preparing their dissertation proposals and identifying the members of their qualifying exam committee.  The second language requirement should be completed by September of the third year.

The Third Year:

This year is spent working on both the dissertation proposal and qualifying exams.  Students are advised to have completed both by the end of this year, which allows them to submit applications for outside funding in the fall of the fourth year.  Students may schedule their proposal presentations in the fall semester, and the exams in the spring, or the reverse.  This decision is made based on the student’s level of preparation, and it should be made in consultation with the advisor and graduate program director.

The Fourth Year:

Students should be fully embarked on dissertation research, and working on grant applications for year five.

The Fifth and Sixth Years:

These should be devoted to dissertation research, writing, and revision, with completion ideally by the end of the sixth year.  Exceptions can be made if the student’s research requires extensive travel and additional language preparation.

 

For Students Entering with an MA:

The First Year

Students entering with an M.A. apply for courses from their prior institution to be accepted at Rutgers.  Twenty four credits is the maximum number accepted.  Final decisions about transfer credits are made at the beginning of the second semester.  If sufficient credits are accepted, students will take one year of courses, including a methods course, unless exemption is granted by the graduate director.  Students are expected to have completed at least one language requirement before entering, and are encouraged to complete their second by the September of the second year.

Students with an M.A. should come to the program with a general idea for potential dissertation topics.  They will be expected to present their dissertation proposals and take their qualifying exams by the end of the second year, and begin to apply for outside funding at the beginning of the third year.  Research and writing of the dissertation will follow as above, with the understanding that students work to complete their dissertations by the end of their fifth year.

Please Note: Mellon Fellowships and other graduate school fellowships are not available to students after the sixth year. 

After the seventh year, students must file a request to the Graduate School, if approved by the graduate program director, to extend their registration.

Master’s Degree Learning Goals and Assessment

                                       The Graduate Program in Art History

                              Master’s Degree Learning Goals and Assessment

                                                Adopted September 2011

 

The Graduate Program in Art History at Rutgers trains M.A. students at an advanced level in the history and theory of the world’s art, architecture and visual culture.  Students are trained as generalists, but explore one field in depth for their Master’s essay. We also provide students with the opportunity to earn professional certificates in Curatorial Studies and in Cultural Heritage and Preservation Studies (CHAPS).  Students can apply to earn either an M.A. in Art History, or an M.A. in CHAPS, although course requirements overlap.  For students interested in pursuing a future Ph.D., we prepare them to apply to top graduate programs.  The Rutgers M.A. is the foundation for museum positions as a curator, educator, administrator, or archivist, and also for positions within the growing field of Cultural Heritage.

Learning Goal One for Students:

*Master the skills of art historical research and writing necessary to work effectively in a variety of museum and academic settings.  Develop critical thinking, ability to do visual analysis, incorporate historical material and identify and use relevant theoretical frameworks.

Assessment of student achievement in Goal One.

*Review graduate course grades and narrative evaluations by faculty. Perform thorough   evaluations of all first year students through a rotating committee of three faculty members, who report on student progress to the graduate director.

*Evaluate students’ completion of requirements: a methods course, coursework in at least three different fields, and four courses with term papers

*Review student progress with close faculty advising and mentoring

*Design a comprehensive written examination assessing the depth and breadth of students’ knowledge of the field of art history.

* Guide student in preparation and completion of the Master’s essay—ordinarily an expansion of a substantial seminar paper.  Two faculty readers will evaluate the essay.

*Roles of the Program in helping students to achieve Goal One

*Provide close advising to ensure that students are being prepared in a coherent and academically rigorous way

*Supply effective, regular monitoring of student progress, with annual reports of student’s progress—from both the student and faculty advisors.

*Conduct a regular review of the curriculum by faculty—its suitability and effectiveness for preparing students for future responsibilities in museums, academia and institutions concerned with cultural heritage preservation. 

*Advise interested students about applying to a competitive PhD program outside Rutgers

*Learning Goal Two for Students:

*Engage in rigorous, original research

 

 

 

*Assessment of graduate student achievement of Goal 2:

*Identification of a topic appropriate for a Master’s essay, with the advice of two faculty readers.

*Production of a Master’s essay, done under the guidance of one faculty advisor, and a second reader

*Present conference papers and outline future articles for publication

*Role of the Graduate program in helping students achieve Goal Two.

*Provide early introduction to research methods and opportunities for research, not only in consultation with one’s potential advisors, but through a Methods course taught for new students every year. 

*Advise on and provide opportunities for presenting research in progress and receiving feedback.

*Provide comprehensive advising and assist in the identification of mentors.

*Learning Goal Three for Students

*Prepare to be professionals in careers that require training at advanced levels for administrative, educational and curatorial positions; positions within the field of preservation studies and cultural heritage; and related fields in which an Art History M.A. is a great advantage: publishing, non-profit foundations, auction houses, and commercial galleries. 

Assessment of graduate student achievement of Goal Three:

*Review evidence of papers written for courses and presented at conferences, exhibition proposals crafted, and/or manuscripts submitted for publication.

*Roles of the program in helping to develop Goal 3:

*Mentor M.A. students in securing internship opportunities

*Offer an exhibition seminar at least every other year, to train students to manage curatorial and educational responsibilities within a museum setting.

*Supervise publication of the Rutgers Art Review, fully staffed by a rotating editorial board of graduate students.

*Host a series of lectures by established scholars and serve as advisors to students on their own lecture series. Advise them on securing funding for the series.

*Survey Alumni and follow up regularly to maintain professional ties.

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